UN / PEACE OPERATIONS WOMEN LEADERS

07-Mar-2022 00:03:08
While the UN has reached gender parity at the senior leadership level, challenges remain, especially in the field. Women leaders are still needed in conflict situations around the world. As International Women's Day approaches, the UN’s Senior Women Talent Pipeline (SWTP) is relaunching the "Time to Lead" campaign, highlighting the stories of courageous women leaders and encouraging women to join Peacekeeping Operations at the senior level. UNDOS
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STORY: UN / SENIOR WOMEN TALENT PIPELINE
SOURCE: UNDOS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: VARIOUS DATES AND LOCATIONS
SHOTLIST
JANUARY 2021 – SOUTH SUDAN

1. Med shot, Hazel de Wet, Chief, Civil Affairs, Political Affairs, UNMISS at her office computer

11 APRIL 2019, SOUTH SUDAN

2. Medium of Hazel de wet at the Malakal Governors and senior commanders conference in South Sudan.

19 JANUARY 2016, SOUTH SUDAN

3. Still shot, Hazel de Wet greeting Peacekeepers from the Republic of Korea.

JANUARY 2021 – SOUTH SUDAN

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Hazel de Wet, Chief, Civil Affairs, Political Affairs, UNMISS:
“Conflict has two sides. And so, it's important that we who are part of the United Nations, have a representative role when engaging with women. We experience in conflict in South Sudan here lots of conflict related sexual violence”

FILE - BENTIU, SOUTH SUDAN

5. Med shot, Hiroko Hirahara, Head of Field Office, Bentiu, South Sudan, UNMISS entering a UN armored vehicle
6. Med shot, Hiroko Hirahara speaking inside the UN armored vehicle
7. Pan right, Hiroko Hirahara greeting village leaders in South Sudan

JANUARY 2021 - BENTIU, SOUTH SUDAN

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Hiroko Hirahara, Head of Field Office, Bentiu, South Sudan, UNMISS:
“The mandate of the mission always talks about women and thanks to the Security Council Resolution 1325. And we are very, very serious about looking at these things. So typically, let's say, for example, we are going to do any activities, project, even patrols. We will never do anything unless there's a woman, a female perspective into the gender perspective, into our activities.”

FILE - MOPTI, MALI

9. Still shot, Fatou Thiam, Head of Field Office, Mopti, Mali, MINUSMA walking away from a helicopter accompanied by armed UN personnel
10. Still shot, Fato Thiam speaking to Mali military leaders
11. Still shot, Mali military and community leaders

JANUARY 2021 - MOPTI, MALI

12. SOUNDBITE (French) Fatou, Thiam, Head of Field Office, Mopti, Mali, MINUSMA:
“When you see countries in crisis, the majority of the victims, who are they? These are women, children. I think it is essential that Peacekeeping Operations also recruit women to be able to speak to that community.”

25 JUNE 2019, MALI

13. Pan right, Joanne Adamson leaving UN aircraft in Mali.

JANUARY 2021 - MALI

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Joanne Adamson, Former Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Political, MINUSMA:
“The fact that now we have some clear targets for the percentages of staff that need to be women in the mission, that really helps managers to be able to offer to women to come and join the mission because they know then that they will be alongside a growing number of women colleagues.”

FILE - MALI

15. Still shot, Joanne Adamson accompanied by MINUSMA personnel in Mali.

JANUARY 2021 - MALI

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Joanne Adamson, Former Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Political, MINUSMA:
“I got support to actually join the mission through the senior women's talent pipeline.”

FILE - MALI

17. Still shot, Joanne Adamson speaking to UN military Mali.

JANUARY 2021, SOUTH SUDAN

18. Various shots, Caroline Waudo, Head of Field Office, Torit, South Sudan, UNMISS seated using mobile phone
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Caroline Waudo, Head of Field Office, Torit, South Sudan, UNMISS:
“The implementation of the gender parity policy is very progressive and has supported women in Peacekeeping Operations because now we have more women joining Peacekeeping Operations, both as UN uniformed personnel and civilian personnel. We have more women in leadership. And I would like to see 50/50 of women and men, especially in leadership positions in the UN.”

FILE – SOUTH SUDAN

20. Various shot, Caroline Waudo with military and community leaders in the field in South Sudan
STORYLINE
While the UN has reached gender parity at the senior leadership level, challenges remain, especially in the field. Women leaders are still needed in conflict situations around the world. As International Women's Day approaches, the UN’s Senior Women Talent Pipeline (SWTP) is relaunching the "Time to Lead" campaign, highlighting the stories of courageous women leaders and encouraging women to join Peacekeeping Operations at the senior level.

“Conflict has two sides. And so, it's important that we who are part of the United Nations have a representative role when engaging with women,” said Hazel de Wet, Chief of Civil Affairs at the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). “We experience in conflict in South Sudan lots of conflict related sexual violence.”

Twenty years ago, UN Security Council Resolution 1325 recognized the impact of armed conflict on women and girls and the urgent need to mainstream gender perspectives in Peacekeeping Operations.

“I think that throughout, the mandate of the mission always talks about women, and thanks to the Security Council Resolution 1325, we are very, very serious about looking at these things,” said Hiroko Hirahara, UNMISS Head of Field Office in Bentiu. “So typically, let's say, for example, if we are going to do any activities, projects, even patrols, we will never do anything unless there's a woman, a female perspective into the gender perspective, into our activities.”

For the UN, increasing the number of women in conflict and post-conflict peacekeeping missions is crucial to building credibility with local communities and establishing lasting peace and sustainable development.

“When you see countries in crisis, the majority of the victims, who are they? These are women, children,” said Fatou Thiam, Head of the Mopti Field Office at the UN Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). “I think it is essential that Peacekeeping Operations also recruit women to be able to speak to that community.”

UN Secretary-General António Guterres has made gender parity among his key priorities. The Senior Women Talent Pipeline was created within the Department of Operational Support to help the UN identify and support women leaders who are candidates for senior positions in UN field missions.

“Now we have some clear targets for the percentages of staff that need to be women in the mission, that really helps managers to be able to offer to women to come and join the mission, said Jo Adamson, Former Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General at MINUSMA. “Where I got support to actually join the mission was through the Senior Women Talent Pipeline, and I know there are some other colleagues who came to the mission that way.”

As a network of women supporting women, the Pipeline relies on women currently working in senior positions at the UN, including Caroline Waudo, Head of UNMISS’s Torit Field Office.

“The implementation of the gender parity policy is very progressive and has supported women in Peacekeeping Operations because now we have more women joining Peacekeeping Operations, both the UN uniformed personnel and civilian personnel,” said Waudo. “We have more women in leadership. And I would like to see 50/50 of women and men, especially in leadership positions in the UN.”

To highlight the crucial role of women in peace and security, the Senior Women Talent Pipeline created the ‘Time to Lead’ media campaign with short video stories from women leaders in UN Peacekeeping. The ‘Time to Lead’ publication features women leaders in senior positions from a range of sectors worldwide and offers concrete advice for the next generation of women in leadership.
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