WFP / MADAGASCAR CYCLONE EMNATI

25-Feb-2022 00:03:18
Tropical Cyclone Emnati, the fourth tropical storm to hit Madagascar in as many weeks, is an example of how weather extremes will trigger runaway humanitarian needs if we do not tackle the climate crisis, warns the World Food Programme. WFP
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STORY: WFP / MADAGASCAR CYCLONE EMNATI
TRT: 03:18
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 7, 22 FEBRUARY 2022, MANAKARA, MADAGASCAR / 10, 23 FEBRUARY 2022 MANAJARY, MADAGASCAR / 23 FEBRUARY, ROME, ITALY/ 14 OCTOBER 2021, MAROFANONY, MADAGASCAR / 12 OCTOBER 2021, MAROFANONY, MADAGASCAR
SHOTLIST
22 FEBRUARY 2022, MANAKARA, MADAGASCAR

1. Various shots, palm trees, houses hit by cyclone

23 FEBRUARY 2022, MANAJARY, MADAGASCAR

2. Driving shot, destruction the day after Cyclone Emnati

10 FEBRUARY 2022, MANAJARY, MADAGASCAR

3. Various shots, destruction caused by Cyclone Batsirai
4. Various shot, WFP beneficiary, salvaging her belongings in the remains of her house, raised to the ground by Cyclone Batsirai
5. SOUNDBITE (Malagasy) Tsabine Eline, WFP beneficiary:
“During the cyclone, we were very scared, and my daughters came to me screaming and crying. Then the roof of the shelter where we were staying came off, and it started to rain in the house. We spent the whole night in the rain and my children crying. In the morning, they were sick from being wet all night.”
6. Various shots, Tsabine receiving WFP cash to help people affected by Cyclone Batsirai buy food

7 FEBRUARY 2022, MANAKARA, MADAGASCAR

7. Various shots, people receiving WFP hot meals
8. Med shot, family eating
9. Med shot, child eating

14 OCTOBER 2021, MAROFANONY, MADAGASCAR

10. Various shots, sandstorm, oxcart

12 OCTOBER 2021, MAROFANONY, MADAGASCAR

11. Various shots, family preparing soup

23 FEBRUARY, ROME, ITALY

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Brian Lander, Deputy Director, Emergencies Division at World Food Programme:
“We are certainly aiming to save lives through emergency assistance and providing the essential food they need to get through this period. And yet we need to think about how they are going to adapt to this new reality for them.”

13 OCTOBER 2021, FAUX CAP, MADAGASCAR

13. Various shot, WFP staff, villagers, plants, dunes, bay

29 SEPTEMBER 2021, BEARA, MADAGASCAR

14. Various shots, farmers, vegetable garden
STORYLINE
Tropical Cyclone Emnati, the fourth tropical storm to hit Madagascar in as many weeks, is an example of how weather extremes will trigger runaway humanitarian needs if we do not tackle the climate crisis, warns the World Food Programme (WPF).

Crashing on Wednesday (24 Feb) into vulnerable communities already at breaking point, Cyclone Emnati threatens to deepen hunger, including in southern Madagascar, which has been reeling from years of severe drought – another manifestation of the country’s vulnerability to climate extremes. Given how dry the land is in these areas, there are now concerns regarding the risk of flash floods.

The storms - Emnati, Dumako, Batsirai, and Ana - have wrecked the island nation, causing widespread damage to agricultural land, including the rice crop that was just weeks away from harvest.

In a country where most people make a living from agriculture, an estimated 90 percent of crops could be destroyed in some affected regions.

The back-to-back storms have impacted market supplies, potentially sending food prices soaring and food insecurity spiraling in the coming months. Forecasts predict another tropical system already forming in the southwest Indian ocean.

“We are certainly aiming to save lives through emergency assistance and providing the essential food they need to get through this period. And yet we need to think about how they are going to adapt to this new reality for them,” said Brian Lander, WFP’s Deputy Director of Emergencies.

As it did to alleviate the impacts of the other recent storms, WFP has stepped up to support the government-led response to Emnati with food and cash assistance, prioritizing displaced families in the worst-off locations as well as with IT and logistics support.

The WFP-run United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) is operating damage-assessment flights and an airbridge between the capital, Antananarivo, and hard-hit, hard-to-reach areas for aid workers and their equipment.

While WFP is in a race against time to assist those affected, its longer-term climate adaptation work helps communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from climate shocks and stresses. Such programmes need to be scaled up, especially for communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis.
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