GENEVA / MADAGASCAR CYCLONE BATSIRAI

04-Feb-2022 00:03:47
The United Nations and its humanitarian partners are ramping up preparedness efforts in anticipation of tropical cyclone Batsirai, expected to make landfall in Madagascar over the weekend and affect about 600,000 people directly. More than 150,000 are likely to be displaced. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: GENEVA / MADAGASCAR CYCLONE BATSIRAI
TRT: 3:47
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 04 FEBRUARY 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
04 FEBRUARY 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior
2. Wide shot, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Clare Nullis, spokesperson, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“Madagascar is bracing for a much more powerful cyclone called Batsirai. It’s currently the equivalent of a category 3 storm and the WMO regional center which is based in La Réunion supported by ‘Météo France’, they are forecasting there is the potential threat to strengthen further ahead of landfall into a category 4 equivalent storm. So that means with winds of about 200 km/hours.”
4. Med shot, TV screen, speakers, cameras
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Jens Laerke, spokesperson, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“We anticipate a significant humanitarian impact in Madagascar, including in areas that are still recovering from Tropical Storm Ana in late January. Our efforts under the Government of Madagascar’s leadership include preparing for the pre-deployment of search and rescue capacity and response teams to areas likely to be impacted, aircrafts being placed on standby to support rapid assessment and response.”
6. Wide shot, press room, journalists, cameraman
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Pasqualina Disirio, Country director in Madagascar, World Food Programme (WFP):
“We have a drought in all parts of Madagascar which has been severe, and this continues to keep the country busy. We had the cyclone Ana just less than 10 days ago, one week ago with 55 deaths. So, there is a major destruction particular of the infrastructure and also the rice field. You know you have to understand that this is the moment for Madagascar and for these islands to prepare for the rice culture, the crops, and they are not yet just there. So, all these crops they might be completely lost.”
8.Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Pasqualina Disirio, Country director in Madagascar, World Food Programme (WFP):
“The authorities, ourselves, we are reacting for this cyclone, and we have this one coming tomorrow, it’s expected in the morning, which is expected to impact more than 600, 000 people with 150, 000 displaced. So, it’s a major crisis, as we can see if it’s really becoming more stronger that it is now it can be worse. So, we all are very nervous.”
10. Close up, spokesperson
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Clare Nullis, spokesperson, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We are in the tropical cyclone season in the Indian ocean, so we are going to see cyclones, we are going to see rainfall. Madagascar it has been a dryer wet season than normal so far, it’s not uniform across the whole Madagascar and it’s really southern Madagascar where really is the bad drought. At this stage, it’s not completely clear if the rainfall from this cyclone is going to hit the whole of the drought affected area.”
12. Wide shot, speakers at the podium
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Pasqualina Disirio, Country director in Madagascar, World Food Programme (WFP):
“The Government, by the way, has declared this day today as a day to prepare for the event. So, people are not going to work, they have been asked to work remotely, and also the kids are not in school, because they needed to prepare some of the infrastructure as refuge.”
14. Wide shot, speakers at the podium
15. Medium shot, spokesperson from behind
16. Close up, hand with pen writing
STORYLINE
The United Nations and its humanitarian partners are ramping up preparedness efforts in anticipation of tropical cyclone Batsirai, expected to make landfall in Madagascar over the weekend and affect about 600,000 people directly. More than 150,000 are likely to be displaced.

Speaking to the media at a press briefing in Geneva today (04 Feb), Clare Nullis, spokesperson for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), said that “Madagascar is bracing for a much more powerful cyclone called Batsirai. It’s currently the equivalent of a category 3 storm and the WMO regional center which is based in La Réunion supported by ‘Météo France’, they are forecasting there is the potential threat to strengthen further ahead of landfall into a category 4 equivalent storm. So that means with winds of about 200 km/hours.”

According to forecasts, Batsirai will make landfall in Eastern Madagascar on Saturday in the region of Mahanoro. The cyclone is also expected to bring heavy rains to Mozambique.

“We anticipate a significant humanitarian impact in Madagascar, including in areas that are still recovering from Tropical Storm Ana in late January,” said Jens Laerke, spokesperson for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).
“Our efforts under the Government of Madagascar’s leadership include preparing for the pre-deployment of search and rescue capacity and response teams to areas likely to be impacted, aircrafts being placed on standby to support rapid assessment and response,” he added.

According to WMO, tropical cyclone experts describe Batsirai as “very dangerous,” especially if strengthening into an intense tropical cyclone threatening lives and livelihoods in Madagascar. Batsirai will exacerbate the already dire humanitarian situation after tropical storm Ana.

“We have a drought in all parts of Madagascar, which has been severe, and this continues to keep the country busy”, said Pasqualina Disirio, Country director in Madagascar of the World Food Programme (WFP). “We had the cyclone Ana just less than 10 days ago, one week ago, with 55 deaths. So, there is a major destruction, particular of the infrastructure and also the rice field. You know you have to understand that this is the moment for Madagascar and for these islands to prepare for the rice culture, the crops, and they are not yet just there. So, all these crops they might be completely lost.”

Batsirai is estimated to bring 50-100 mm of rainfall late Friday, with the main bulk falling through Saturday, where a further 300 mm of rain could accumulate.

“The authorities, ourselves, we are reacting for this cyclone, and we have this one coming tomorrow, it’s expected in the morning, which is expected to impact more than 600, 000 people with 150,000 displaced”, said WFP’s County director. “So, it’s a major crisis, as we can see if it’s really becoming stronger than it is now, it can be worse. So, we all are very nervous.”

Due to the arid conditions at this time of the year, there is increased risks of flash flood and landslides during extreme rainfall, such as predicted for cyclone Batsirai.

“We are in the tropical cyclone season in the Indian ocean, so we are going to see cyclones, we are going to see rainfall,” said WMO’s Clare Nullis. She added that “Madagascar, it has been a dryer wet season than normal so far, it’s not uniform across the whole Madagascar, and it’s really southern Madagascar where really is the bad drought. At this stage, it’s not completely clear if the rainfall from this cyclone is going to hit the whole of the drought-affected area.”
Category
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed220204a