UN / TERRORISM CLIMATE CHANGE

09-Dec-2021 00:03:02
Secretary-General António Guterres told the Security Council that “often, the regions most vulnerable to climate change also suffer from insecurity, poverty, weak governance and the scourge of terrorism.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / TERRORISM CLIMATE CHANGE
TRT: 03:02
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 DECEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

09 DECEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Med shot, Secretary-General António Guterres at the dais
4. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Often, the regions most vulnerable to climate change also suffer from insecurity, poverty, weak governance and the scourge of terrorism. Of the 15 countries most exposed to climate risks, eight host a UN peacekeeping mission or special political mission. The effects of climate are superimposed on conflicts and exacerbate fragilities. When climate change contributes to pressure on institutions and hinders their ability to provide public services, it fuels grievances and mistrust of power. When the loss of livelihoods leaves people in despair, it makes more attractive the promises of protection, income and justice behind which terrorist groups sometimes hide their designs.”
5. Wide shot, Council
6. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“In the Lake Chad Basin, Boko Haram has been able to mobilize new recruits, especially among local communities disillusioned by the lack of economic opportunities and access to essential resources. In central Mali, terrorist groups have exploited growing tensions between herders and farmers to recruit members from pastoralist communities, who often feel excluded and stigmatized. And environmental degradation allows non-state armed groups to expand their influence and manipulate resources to their advantage. In Iraq and Syria, for example, Daesh has exploited water shortages and taken control of water infrastructure to impose its will on communities. In Somalia, Al-Shabaab's charcoal production is also an important source of income.”
7. Med shot, Council President
8. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We need better analysis and early-warning systems. Every conflict-prevention initiative must take into account climate risks. Understanding and anticipating the cascading effects of climate change will strengthen our work on peace and security.”
9. Wide shot, Council
10. SOUNDBITE (French) Mohamed Bazoum, President, Niger:
“I think it is important that – following on the heels of COP 26 – the Council capitalizes on the various areas of consensus obtained in order to encourage strategies that will help to attenuate the effects of climate change in accordance with its mandate to maintain international peace and security.”
11. Wide shot, Council
STORYLINE
Secretary-General António Guterres today (9 Dec) told the Security Council that “often, the regions most vulnerable to climate change also suffer from insecurity, poverty, weak governance and the scourge of terrorism.”

Noting that eight out of 15 countries most exposed to climate risks, eight host a UN peacekeeping mission or special political mission, Guterres said, “the effects of climate are superimposed on conflicts and exacerbate fragilities” and thereby “fuels grievances and mistrust of power.”

He said, “when the loss of livelihoods leaves people in despair, it makes more attractive the promises of protection, income and justice behind which terrorist groups sometimes hide their designs.”

The Secretary-General said, “in the Lake Chad Basin, Boko Haram has been able to mobilize new recruits, especially among local communities disillusioned by the lack of economic opportunities and access to essential resources. In central Mali, terrorist groups have exploited growing tensions between herders and farmers to recruit members from pastoralist communities, who often feel excluded and stigmatized. And environmental degradation allows non-state armed groups to expand their influence and manipulate resources to their advantage. In Iraq and Syria, for example, Daesh has exploited water shortages and taken control of water infrastructure to impose its will on communities. In Somalia, Al-Shabaab's charcoal production is also an important source of income.”

He said, “every conflict-prevention initiative must take into account climate risks” and stressed that “understanding and anticipating the cascading effects of climate change will strengthen our work on peace and security.”

The President of Niger, Mohamed Bazoum, who presided over the Council meeting, said, “it is important that – following on the heels of COP 26 – the Council capitalizes on the various areas of consensus obtained in order to encourage strategies that will help to attenuate the effects of climate change in accordance with its mandate to maintain international peace and security.”

The concept note prepared ahead of the meeting by Niger - one of the countries most affected by both climate change and terrorism - said threats to peace and security caused by climate change and terrorism “do not spare any parts of the world” and highlights the impact that groups like the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL/Da’esh) and Al-Qaeda have had in the Middle East and Africa.
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