UN / PEACEBUILDING DIVERSITY

12-Oct-2021 00:03:36
Secretary-General António Guterres told the Security Council that “without including a wide range of diverse voices at every step” of the peacebuilding process, “any peace will be short-lived.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / PEACEBUILDING DIVERSITY
TRT: 03:36
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 OCTOBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

12 OCTOBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Med shot, Secretary-General at the Security Council dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Peace is not found in a piece of paper. It is found in people. More specifically, a diversity of people from different backgrounds coming together to chart a common course for a country. Parties to conflict can agree to end hostilities. They can agree to begin the long process of rebuilding a country. And they can even join forces to reconstitute a government. But without including a wide range of diverse voices at every step of this process – without bringing all people along – any peace will be short-lived.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“While inequalities exist in every country, they are particularly rampant in countries where social services like health, education, security and justice are lacking. And where the scars of colonialism are still visible – seen in arbitrarily drawn borders, and historical advantages for certain groups over others. Against this backdrop, the COVID-19 pandemic has compounded inequalities, and reversed development and peacebuilding gains. These inequalities and weak governance structures create a vacuum that is easily filled by the voices of intolerance and extremism that can lead to violent conflict.”
7. Wide shot, Council, Rwandan President Paul Kagame on screen
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Kagame, President, Rwanda:
“Peacebuilding is not a purely technical enterprise. It is deeply political and human and must take account of the emotions and memories that various parties bring to the table.”
9. Wide shot, Council, former President of South Africa Thabo Mbeki on screen
10. SOUNDBITE (English)Thabo Mbeki, former President, South Africa:
“The belligerence in Ethiopia should enter into a permanent ceasefire and engage one another in an inclusive national dialogue precisely to agree on what they should do together to achieve the very important and noble goal of unity and diversity. At the end of the Biafra war in Nigeria in 1970, the victorious national leaders announced that they would follow a policy of no victor, no vanquished. I believe, chairperson, that this is what Ethiopia needs."
11. Med shot, delegates
12. Wide shot, Council
13. Pan left, Kenya’s President and Ambassador walk up to podium
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Uhuru Kenyatta, President, Kenya:
“Many countries today seem unable to manage diversity. We have built a global system that increases divisions between, but also within nations. A system that believes there are races or genders which are inferior, or superior, or religions that are closer to God than others. Consequently, many of the conflict situations before our Security Council are directly or indirectly a consequence of poorly managed identity defined grievances.”
15. Pan right, Kenya’s delegation walks away
STORYLINE
Secretary-General António Guterres today (12 Oct) told the Security Council that “without including a wide range of diverse voices at every step” of the peacebuilding process, “any peace will be short-lived.”

The UN chief, addressing an open debate on diversity, statebuilding and the search for peace, organized by Kenya, which holds the rotating Council presidency this month, said, “peace is not found in a piece of paper. It is found in people. More specifically, a diversity of people from different backgrounds coming together to chart a common course for a country.”

Guterres said, “while inequalities exist in every country, they are particularly rampant in countries where social services like health, education, security and justice are lacking. And where the scars of colonialism are still visible – seen in arbitrarily drawn borders, and historical advantages for certain groups over others.”

Against this backdrop, he added, “the COVID-19 pandemic has compounded inequalities, and reversed development and peacebuilding gains.”

Inequalities and weak governance structures, the Secretary-General said, “create a vacuum that is easily filled by the voices of intolerance and extremism that can lead to violent conflict.”

In his address, President Kagame of Rwanda underscored how peacebuilding “is not a purely technical enterprise.” He said, “it is deeply political and human and must take account of the emotions and memories that various parties bring to the table.”

On the situation in Ethiopia, former South African President Thabo Mbeki said, “the belligerence in Ethiopia should enter into a permanent ceasefire and engage one another in an inclusive national dialogue precisely to agree on what they should do together to achieve the very important and noble goal of unity and diversity. At the end of the Biafra war in Nigeria in 1970, the victorious national leaders announced that they would follow a policy of no victor, no vanquished. I believe, chairperson, that this is what Ethiopia needs."

Talking to reporters outside the Council, President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya said, “many countries today seem unable to manage diversity. We have built a global system that increases divisions between, but also within nations. A system that believes there are races or genders which are inferior, or superior, or religions that are closer to God than others. Consequently, many of the conflict situations before our Security Council are directly or indirectly a consequence of poorly managed identity defined grievances.”

Today’s meeting, chaired by Kenyatta, was held because most situations on the Security Council’s agenda arise from internal conflicts in which identity issues—whether ethnic, racial, religious, or socioeconomic--play a part.
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