OHCHR / BACHELET ROHINGYA HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDER

01-Oct-2021 00:04:36
The United Nations High commissioner’s Michelle Bachelet expressed shock and sadness over the killing of Rohingya human rights defender Mohib Ullah, and called for a prompt, thorough and effective investigation into his death. OHCHR
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STORY: OHCHR / BACHELET ROHINGYA HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDER
TRT: 04:36
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 OCTOBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior Palais des Nations

01 OCTOBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“For years Mohib Ullah methodically collected information about human rights violations suffered by the Rohingya in their home state of Rakhine, in north-western Myanmar, and he sought to galvanise international action. And it is terrible that a person who spent his life fighting to ensure that the violations committed against the Rohingya people were known world-wide, has been murdered in this way.”

FILE - 12 MARCH 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohib Ullah, Chair, Arakan Rohingya Society for Peace and Human Rights (ARSPH):
“My name Mohib Ullah from Cox’s Bazar refugee camp Bangladesh. I want you to Imagine something this afternoon, imagine you have no identity, no ethnicity, no country. Nobody wants you. How would you feel? This is how we feel today as Rohingya.”
5. Wide shot, Human Rights Council

01 OCTOBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Mohib Ullah’s words were very powerful and highlighted the terrible situation of the Rohingya and today, four years later, they echo as a reminder that Rohingya are still waiting for justice and still waiting to return home.”
7. Wide shot, briefing room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“His death highlights the precarious conditions of the Rohingya in both countries. We need to do much more to help this persecuted community, both in Bangladesh and in Myanmar.”
9. Wide shot, briefing room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Insecurity has been increasing alarmingly in the Kutupalong / Cox’s Bazar camp, with growing criminality, rising tensions between different groups, as well as heavy handed security crackdowns during anti-drug operations. Anti-Rohingya sentiment has also been increasing within Bangladeshi communities”.
11. Wide shot, briefing room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Whoever was responsible for his murder, Mohib Ullah’s death is a clear example of the insecurity in the camp, and the apparent attempts to silence moderate civil society voices”.
13. Close up, TV monitor
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“We fully understand the huge challenges Bangladesh has faced in hosting the Rohingya refugees, and the need for more external support. However, the safety and protection and rights of refugees of those hosted in Cox’s Bazar and Bhasan Char must be insured.”
15. Wide shot, briefing room
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Meanwhile in Myanmar itself, the situation of approximately 600,000 Rohingya who remain in Rakhine State remains dire, with many still confined in camps. Alleged violations include unlawful killings, arbitrary arrest and detention, and high levels of extortion.”
17. Wide shot, podium
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“On the situation inside Myanmar itself, it is still a very serious situation indeed, more than 1,120 individuals are estimated to have been killed by military authorities since 1 February, either at peaceful demonstrations or during arrests, indeed while in custody, including due to torture and ill-treatment – and this is very likely an under-count of the true death toll. As you know peaceful protesters have been dispersed violently, they have been shot at and killed; suspected anti-military and pro-democracy activists surveilled, pursued, hunted down and detained; family members, including children, have been taken hostage to coerce suspects to surrender; people’s homes and villages raided and looted.”
19. Wide shot, briefing room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“We have collected a multitude of information demonstrating human rights violations and abuses. Some of these have characteristics of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, which could potentially amount to crimes against humanity. We have also documented violations of humanitarian law in situations of armed conflict within Myanmar, and some of those may amount to war crimes. Of course, the patterns of grave violations committed over many years now by the Tatmadaw against ethnic minorities are now being perpetrated against a broad cross section of society throughout the country.”
21. Wide shot, briefing room
STORYLINE
The United Nations High commissioner’s Michelle Bachelet expressed “shock and sadness” over the killing of Rohingya human rights defender Mohib Ullah, and called for a prompt, thorough and effective investigation into his death.

At the bi-weekly press briefing today (1 Oct), the spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Rupert Colville said, “for years Mohib Ullah methodically collected information about human rights violations suffered by the Rohingya in their home state of Rakhine, in north-western Myanmar, and he sought to galvanise international action. And it is terrible that a person who spent his life fighting to ensure that the violations committed against the Rohingya people were known world-wide, has been murdered in this way.”

Mohib Ullah, who was chair of the Arakan Rohingya Society for Peace and Human Rights (ARSPH), was shot dead on Wednesday by unknown assailants in the Kutupalong / Cox’s Bazar refugee camp in southern Bangladesh. Set up in August 2017, the camp currently hosts more than 750,000 Rohingya who fled the mass killings, rapes and persecution by the Myanmar army and security forces.

He travelled to Geneva in March 2019 to address the 40th session of the Human Rights Council in person, explaining how deeply the Rohingya had been discriminated against for decades and deprived of their basic rights, including nationality, land, health, and education.

Addressing the Human Rights Council he said, “my name Mohib Ullah from Cox’s Bazar refugee camp Bangladesh. I want you to Imagine something this afternoon, imagine you have no identity, no ethnicity, no country. Nobody wants you. How would you feel? This is how we feel today as Rohingya.”

Colville said, “Mohib Ullah’s words were very powerful and highlighted the terrible situation of the Rohingya and today, four years later, they echo as a reminder that Rohingya are still waiting for justice and still waiting to return home.”

His death, Colville continued, “highlights the precarious conditions of the Rohingya in both countries. We need to do much more to help this persecuted community, both in Bangladesh and in Myanmar.”

He said, “insecurity has been increasing alarmingly in the Kutupalong / Cox’s Bazar camp, with growing criminality, rising tensions between different groups, as well as heavy handed security crackdowns during anti-drug operations. Anti-Rohingya sentiment has also been increasing within Bangladeshi communities”.

The spokesperson said, “whoever was responsible for his murder, Mohib Ullah’s death is a clear example of the insecurity in the camp, and the apparent attempts to silence moderate civil society voices.”

The High Commissioner is calling for a prompt, thorough, and independent investigation should be conducted not only to identify and apprehend his killers, and expose their motives, but also to define what measures are needed to better protect vulnerable civil society leaders, while avoiding further securitisation in the camps.

Colville said, “we fully understand the huge challenges Bangladesh has faced in hosting the Rohingya refugees, and the need for more external support. However, the safety and protection and rights of refugees of those hosted in Cox’s Bazar and Bhasan Char must be insured.”

He said, “meanwhile in Myanmar itself, the situation of approximately 600,000 Rohingya who remain in Rakhine State remains dire, with many still confined in camps. Alleged violations include unlawful killings, arbitrary arrest and detention, and high levels of extortion.”

“On the situation inside Myanmar itself,” he said, “it is still a very serious situation indeed, more than 1,120 individuals are estimated to have been killed by military authorities since 1 February, either at peaceful demonstrations or during arrests, indeed while in custody, including due to torture and ill-treatment – and this is very likely an under-count of the true death toll. As you know peaceful protesters have been dispersed violently, they have been shot at and killed; suspected anti-military and pro-democracy activists surveilled, pursued/hunted down and detained; family members, including children, have been taken hostage to coerce suspects to surrender; people’s homes and villages raided and looted.”

Colville said, “we have collected a multitude of information demonstrating human rights violations and abuses. Some of these have characteristics of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, which could potentially amount to crimes against humanity. We have also documented violations of humanitarian law in situations of armed conflict within Myanmar, and some of those may amount to war crimes. Of course, the patterns of grave violations committed over many years now by the Tatmadaw against ethnic minorities are now being perpetrated against a broad cross section of society throughout the country.”
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