SOUTH SUDAN / DEBATE FOR PEACE

30-Sep-2021 00:03:33
In Aweil, Northern Bahr El Ghazal, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) organized a student debate with young girls and boys from two secondary schools where both teams deliberated on an important topic: Whether the Revitalized Peace Agreement should be made part of the regular curriculum in schools. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / DEBATE FOR PEACE
TRT: 03:33
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 21 SEPTEMBER 2021, AWEIL, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, procession by students
2. Various shots, students dancing in hall
3. Various shots, students waiting for debate to start
4. Various shots, debate teams waiting
5. Various shots, students listening to debate
6. Various shots, students debating
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ayi Chol Ayi, Student, South Sudan Education Center:
“The Peace Agreement that they are arguing to be added to the curriculum is promoting gender inequality. Why do I say so? The Peace Agreement talked about the ladies being given 35 percent in the government. That one neglects or ignores the power of the ladies, which shows the gender inequality in South Sudan.”
8. Wide shot, debating session
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Viviana Akol Marach Student, Aweil National:
“Peace promotes interactions among the tribes. We know in Aweil we have so many tribes. It is because we have peace in Aweil and that is why they have come from far flung places such as Uganda and Kenya. I think why we have so many tribes here is because of peace. When there is no peace, no interaction among the people in this country and that is why we say peace must be taught in the schools.”
10. Med shot, students
11. Med shot, students being gifted promotional items
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Alfred Zulu, Acting Head of Office, UNMISS Aweil:
“If all the schools of South Sudan in all the ten states can begin to teach young stars from the lowest levels of learning to the highest levels of education, this is going to have a multiplier effect in terms of understanding the issues of peace and at the same time, it is going to create a culture of peacebuilding among pupils, among citizens so that when they grow up their desire to fight will be eliminated.”
13. Various shots, students singing with hands across their chests
STORYLINE
In Aweil, Northern Bahr El Ghazal, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) organized a student debate with young girls and boys from two secondary schools where both teams deliberated on an important topic: Whether the Revitalized Peace Agreement should be made part of the regular curriculum in schools.

Young people have perhaps been worst affected by ongoing conflict across South Sudan.

Dances, singing and spirited discussions were the theme of this year’s International Peace Day celebrations in Aweil, which brought together some 130 students drawn from two Secondary schools here to debate a cogent topic: Should the Revitalized Peace Agreement be taught to children as part of their regular school curriculum.

For 20-year-old Ayi Chol Ayi, opposing the motion was natural on the grounds that it wasn’t inclusive enough.

SOUNDBITE (English) Ayi Chol Ayi, Student, South Sudan Education Center:
“The Peace Agreement that they are arguing to be added to the curriculum is promoting gender inequality. Why do I say so? The Peace Agreement talked about the ladies being given 35 percent in the government. That one neglects or ignores the power of the ladies, which shows the gender inequality in South Sudan.”

Despite Ayi’s well thought out reservations, the team that argued for the motion made a very considered case for including the Peace Agreement at all levels of learning. Their point: familiarizing students from an early age on the need for durable peace is bound to ensure that younger generations grow up appreciating the value of social unity.

SOUNDBITE (English) Viviana Akol Marach Student, Aweil National:
“Peace promotes interactions among the tribes. We know in Aweil we have so many tribes. It is because we have peace in Aweil and that is why they have come from far flung places such as Uganda and Kenya. I think why we have so many tribes here is because of peace. When there is no peace, no interaction among the people in this country and that is why we say peace must be taught in the schools.”

This argument won the hearts and minds of both judges as well as students and the team overcame stiff competition from naysayers to win prizes and certificates.

SOUNDBITE (English) Alfred Zulu, Acting Head of Office, UNMISS Aweil:
“If all the schools of South Sudan in all the ten states can begin to teach young stars from the lowest levels of learning to the highest levels of education, this is going to have a multiplier effect in terms of understanding the issues of peace and at the same time, it is going to create a culture of peacebuilding among pupils, among citizens so that when they grow up their desire to fight will be eliminated.”

The event concluded with students performing peace songs and poems.
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