SOUTH SUDAN / TAMBURA WATER DISPLACED

13-Sep-2021 00:03:07
Recognizing the needs of displaced people who have fled recent conflict in Tambura, Western Equatoria, Blue Helmets from the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) have started water collection escort patrols. The main aim: To accompany displaced people as they fetch water from a nearby source. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / TAMBURA WATER DISPLACED
TRT: 03:07
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 SEPEMBER 2021, TAMBURA, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1.Various shots, displaced communities going for water
2.SOUNDBITE (Zande) Leticia Mario Sasa, a displaced person in Tambura:
“The water we are drinking is dirty. We are afraid that tomorrow or the next day all of us will fall sick. Our children and all of us will be ill and start dying. We live in very congested conditions, we don’t get any fresh air and cannot physically distance because we are afraid of being killed.”
3. Various shots, displaced communities going for water
4. SOUNDBITE (Zande) Margret Albert Mikisi, an internally displaced person in Tambura:
“We are thankful for what [UNMISS] peacekeepers are doing to escort us to Mamenze. We are afraid of going into the forest by ourselves. But when they escort us, we feel protected. It is a good thing that they are doing. When they escort us at day time we can collect water to combat scarcity [of this precious resource].”
5. Various shot, displaced communities going for water
6.SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Farai Nyamayaro, UNMISS Civil Affairs Officer:
“The focus of UNMISS has been life-saving intervention. What we have primarily focused on is trying to calm the violence; but at the same time give protection to the IDPs [internally displaced persons]. We have three IDP sites that we are giving force protection [to] and within these IDP sites there have been needs that we are trying to address. We have done water patrols where we accompany IDPs to collect water from a source nearby. On top of that, we have also been trying to [conduct] high level engagements facilitating government officials and other military personnel so that they may come [here] and help stop the violence that is taking place here.”
7. Various shots, displaced communities going for water.
STORYLINE
Recognizing the needs of displaced people who have fled recent conflict in Tambura, Western Equatoria, Blue Helmets from the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) have started water collection escort patrols. The main aim: To accompany displaced people as they fetch water from a nearby source.

Many newly displaced are deeply concerned about the lack of hygiene and safe drinking water.

SOUNDBITE (Zande) Leticia Mario Sasa, a displaced person in Tambura:
“The water we are drinking is dirty. We are afraid that tomorrow or the next day all of us will fall sick. Our children and all of us will be ill and start dying. We live in very congested conditions, we don’t get any fresh air and cannot physically distance because we are afraid.”
Margret Albert, a displaced woman, is thankful to UNMISS peacekeepers for regular escorts to collect water to mitigate at least some if not all sanitation concerns.
“We are thankful for what [UNMISS] peacekeepers are doing to escort us to collect water. We are afraid of going into the forest by ourselves. But when they escort us, we feel protected. It is a good thing that they are doing. When they escort us at day time we can collect water to combat scarcity [of this precious resource].”

More than 40,000 displaced persons, mostly women and children, are currently being protected by UNMISS peacekeepers across three different sites within Tambura. The UN Peacekeeping mission is focused on keeping them safe and preventing further violence.

SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Farai Nyamayaro, UNMISS Civil Affairs Officer in Yambio:
“The focus of UNMISS has been life-saving intervention. What we have primarily focused on is trying to calm the violence; but at the same time give protection to the IDPs [internally displaced persons]. We have three IDP sites that we are giving force protection [to] and within these IDP sites there have been needs that we are trying to address. We have done water patrols where we accompany IDPs to collect water from a source nearby. On top of that, we have also been trying to [conduct] high level engagements facilitating government officials and other military personnel so that they may come [here] and help to stop the violence that is taking place here.”
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