UN / SMALL ARMS ILLICIT TRADE

05-Aug-2021 00:01:49
Ambassador Martin Kimani of Kenya announced that “for the first time” the outcome document from the biennial meeting on small arms contained language on ammunition, “a big shift” which means that “at long last the issue of ammunition is squarely in the agenda of the programme of action.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SMALL ARMS ILLICIT TRADE
TRT: 01:49
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 05 AUGUST 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

05 AUGUST 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press conference dais
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Kimani, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Kenya, and Chair, Seventh Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA BMS7):
“For the first time there was language on ammunition. This is something that has been very difficult to get consensus and agreement on. There was language on ammunition in the outcome document that was achieved without a vote. The last time the language was included, the United States and Israel called for a vote. This time the two of them embraced the language in the outcome document. And, so, this is a big shift for the small arms community. It means at long last the issue of ammunition is squarely in the agenda of the programme of action.”
4. Med shot, reporter
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Kimani, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Kenya, and Chair, Seventh Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA BMS7):
“One of the things many delegations have had a problem with is, look, if we are talking about an illicit AK-47, an illicit AK-47 does not do the damage it does without the ammunition. Right, and this seems common-sensical, but for some reason there are countries that were really opposed to it.”
6. Med shot, reporter
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Kimani, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Kenya, and Chair, Seventh Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA BMS7):
“If you look at the impact of small arms and light weapons today, it is no exaggeration to say that in terms of human security, in terms of humanitarian crises, in terms of sheer human suffering, there’s probably very few rivals to the use of this weaponry. And 20 years ago, states came together to try and find ways to improve how these weapons are regulated, how the stockpiles are managed, and to make sure that they are properly and reliably marked.”
8. Wide shot, end op presser
STORYLINE
Ambassador Martin Kimani of Kenya today (5 Aug) announced that “for the first time” the outcome document from the biennial meeting on small arms contained language on ammunition, “a big shift” which means that “at long last the issue of ammunition is squarely in the agenda of the programme of action.”

Kimani, who is the Chair of Seventh Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA BMS7), said, “this is something that has been very difficult to get consensus and agreement on. There was language on ammunition in that was achieved without a vote. The last time the language was included, the United States and Israel called for a vote. This time the two of them embraced the language in the outcome document. “

The Kenyan Ambassador said, “if we are talking about an illicit AK-47, an illicit AK-47 does not do the damage it does without the ammunition,” adding that “this seems common-sensical, but for some reason there are countries that were really opposed to it.”

Kimani said, “if you look at the impact of small arms and light weapons today, it is no exaggeration to say that in terms of human security, in terms of humanitarian crises, in terms of sheer human suffering, there’s probably very few rivals to the use of this weaponry.”

He noted that “20 years ago, states came together to try and find ways to improve how these weapons are regulated, how the stockpiles are managed, and to make sure that they are properly and reliably marked.”

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, PoA BMS7 had been postponed from 15–19 June 2020 until last week.

The Programme of Action (PoA), adopted by consensus on 20 July 2001, is a policy framework containing political commitments by states to prevent, combat and eradicate the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects. It is a detailed instrument, covering production/ manufacturing, stockpiling and possession, international transfers, illicit transfers and law enforcement, collection and destruction. It calls for action at national, regional and global levels, and sets an agenda for the UN process on small arms control.
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