UNICEF / CHILDREN VACCINATION BACKSLIDING

14-Jul-2021 00:02:37
According to official data published today by WHO and UNICEF, 23 million children missed out on basic vaccines through routine immunization services in 2020 - 3.7 million more than in 2019. UNICEF
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STORY: UNICEF / CHILDREN VACCINATION BACKSLIDING
TRT: 2:37
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: FILE – MULTIPLE DATES AND LOCATIONS
SHOTLIST
FILE - 04 APRIL 2019, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Med shot, health worker opening cold storage
2. Med shot, health worker removing vaccines from cold storage
3. Med shot, health workers on bicycles with vaccines in cold storage

FILE - 10 AUGUST 2018, BENI, NORTH KIVU PROVINCE, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

4. Med shot, Ebola vaccination team member fills a syringe with the Ebola vaccine
5. Close up, Ebola vaccination team member fills a syringe with the Ebola vaccine

FILE - 24-26 MARCH 2017, BAYANGA DISTRICT, SANGHA MBAERE REGION, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

6. Wide shot, UNICEF health worker meeting with members of the community
7. Wide shot, UNICEF health worker meeting with members of the community

30 NOVEMBER 2017, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH

8. Med shot, Health worker with vaccine and syringe
9. Med shot, Health worker delivers measles vaccine to child
10. Med shot, Dr. Helen Chakma speaks to family

22-26 FEBRUARY 2020, AMBULATORY OF COMMUNITY OF SAN JOSÉ DE KAYAMÁ, BOLIVAR STATE, VENEZUELA

11. Med shot, child is vaccinated
12. Med shot, Community volunteer holds a supply box and takes it to the ambulatory.
13. Med shot, child is vaccinated.
14. Med shot, children smile at the camera.
15. Med shot, Alejandra Pocaterra, Venezuela Country Office Producer teaches children of the Hoti and Eñepá ethnic groups to wash their hands correctly.

07 MAY 2020, DHAKA, BANGLADESH

16. Wide shot, parents and their babies in waiting room
17. Med shot, parents and their babies in waiting room
18. Close up, parent with baby in waiting room
19. Close up, mother waits as she consults with doctor
20. Med shot, mother waits as she consults with doctor
21. Close up, doctor prepares immunizations
22. Close up, doctor prepares immunizations
23. Close up, doctor prepares immunizations

02 JULY 2020, KATHMANDU, NEPAL

24. Wide shot, health workers putting on hand sanitizer
25. Close up, health workers putting on hand sanitizer
26. Close up, vaccine in tray
27. Med shot, vaccine being prepared
28. Med shot, vaccine being prepared
29. Close up, finger marked for immunization
30. Med shot, vaccine delivered to child
STORYLINE
According to official data published today by WHO and UNICEF, 23 million children missed out on basic vaccines through routine immunization services in 2020 - 3.7 million more than in 2019.

This latest set of comprehensive worldwide childhood immunization figures, the first official figures to reflect global service disruptions due to COVID-19, show a majority of countries last year experienced drops in childhood vaccination rates.

UNICEF said up to 17 million children likely did not receive a single vaccine during the year, widening already immense inequities in vaccine access. Most of these children live in communities affected by conflict, in under-served remote places, or in informal or slum settings where they face multiple deprivations including limited access to basic health and key social services.

Disruptions in immunization services were widespread in 2020, with the WHO Southeast Asian and Eastern Mediterranean Regions most affected. As access to health services and immunization outreach were curtailed, the number of children not receiving even their very first vaccinations increased in all regions. As compared with 2019, 3.5 million more children missed their first dose of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine (DTP-1) while three million more children missed their first measles dose.

The data also showed that middle-income countries now account for an increasing share of unprotected children – that is, children missing out on at least some vaccine doses. India is experiencing a particularly large drop, with DTP-3 coverage falling from 91 per cent to 85 per cent.

Fuelled by funding shortfalls, vaccine misinformation, instability and other factors, a troubling picture is also emerging in WHO’s Region of the Americas, where vaccination coverage continues to fall. Just 82 per cent of children are fully vaccinated with DTP, down from 91 per cent in 2016.

Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, global childhood vaccination rates against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles and polio had stalled for several years at around 86 per cent. This rate is well below the 95 per cent recommended by WHO to protect against measles – often the first disease to resurge when children are not reached with vaccines - and insufficient to stop other vaccine-preventable diseases.

With many resources and personnel diverted to support the COVID-19 response, there have been significant disruptions to immunization service provision in many parts of the world. In some countries, clinics have been closed or hours reduced, while people may have been reluctant to seek healthcare because of fear of transmission or have experienced challenges reaching services due to lockdown measures and transportation disruptions.

As countries work to recover lost ground due to COVID-19 related disruptions, UNICEF, WHO and partners like Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance are supporting efforts to strengthen immunization systems by: restoring services and vaccination campaigns so countries can safely deliver routine immunization programmes during the COVID-19 pandemic; helping health workers and community leaders communicate actively with caregivers to explain the importance of vaccinations; rectifying gaps in immunization coverage, including identifying communities and people who have been missed during the pandemic, ensuring that COVID-19 vaccine delivery is independently planned for and financed and that it occurs alongside, and not at the cost of childhood vaccination services, and implementing country plans to prevent and respond to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, and strengthen immunization systems as part of COVID-19 recovery efforts.

The agencies are working with countries and partners to deliver the ambitious targets of the global Immunization Agenda 2030, which aims to achieve 90 per cent coverage for essential childhood vaccines; halve the number of entirely unvaccinated, or ‘zero dose’ children, and increase the uptake of newer lifesaving vaccines such as rotavirus or pneumococcus in low and middle-income countries.
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