IFAD / FAMILY REMITTANCES

14-Jun-2021 00:01:49
Despite a massive 65 percent increase in migrants sending money home via mobile transfers in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of their rural family members struggle to access mobile banking services which could help lift them out of poverty. IFAD
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STORY: IFAD / FAMILY REMITTANCES
TRT: 1:47
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NEPALESE /NATS

DATELINE: JUNE 2021, ROME, ITALY /FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE

1.Various shot, Pushpa Raut with her family, cattle, in Nepal
2.SOUNDBITE (Nepalese) Pushpa Raut, Wife of Nepalese Migrant Worker:
"My husband is working abroad for the last 10 years. Now he is in Dubai, doing some tailoring related work.”
3.Various aerial shots, Nigeria
4.Wide shot, street with closed shops, Brazil
5.Various shots, Moldova farmer receiving remittances
6.Various shots, people in different countries receiving money
7.SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Bibiana Carrera, Bancolumbia Online Transfer:
“COVID 19 showed that although Columbians experienced economic difficulties, they continued sending money to their families to help them.”
8.Various shots, people on mobile phones, laptops and counting money
9.SOUNDBITE (English) Meike Van Ginneken, Associate Vice President, Strategy and Knowledge department, IFAD:
“In today’s modern economy, remittances represent the human face of globalization and the international community needs to work together to not only make it cheaper, but also to make it count more for millions of families and the communities where they live.”
10.Wide shot, Pushpa Raut with her family, cattle, in Nepal
STORYLINE
Despite a massive 65 percent increase in migrants sending money home via mobile transfers in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of their rural family members struggle to access mobile banking services which could help lift them out of poverty.

On the International Day of Family Remittance (16th June) the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is calling on governments and the private sector to urgently invest in digital infrastructure and mobile services in developing countries to ensure rural families are not left behind.

Pushpa Raut lives in a remote rural region of Nepal, but she and her family rely on money sent back from her husband working thousands of miles away in another country.

SOUNDBITE (Nepalese) Pushpa Raut, Wife of Nepalese Migrant Worker:
"My husband is working abroad for the last 10 years. Now he is in Dubai, doing some tailoring related work.”

Her husband is one of 200 million workers around the world who send remittances to their families back home. Many families use the money for basic essentials like food, or to pay for their families schooling or healthcare.
Despite early predictions of a drop in remittances, due to COVID 19 bank closures and movement restrictions, global remittances remained steady in 2020, dropping just 1.6 percent to USD 540 billion.

The steady flow of remittances highlighted the huge importance migrants place on sending money home.

SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Bibiana Carrera, Bancolumbia Online Transfer:
“COVID 19 showed that although Columbians experienced economic difficulties, they continued sending money to their families to help them.”

Remittances also remained resilient because migrant workers turned to digital technology to help them to continue to send money home.

Lockdowns and social distancing rules saw many people turned away from cash to using mobile money transfers. As a result, mobile remittances increased 65 percent during 2020 to USD 12.7 billion.

However, despite this massive increase, millions of migrants’ rural family members struggle to access mobile banking services and connectivity. Often mobile money service providers are only located in urban centres. This means millions of poor, rural people have to travel long distances to towns or cities, often at significant cost, to receive the cash sent digitally by their migrant family members.

SOUNDBITE (English) Meike Van Ginneken, Associate Vice President, Strategy and Knowledge department, IFAD:
“In today’s modern economy, remittances represent the human face of globalization and the international community needs to work together to not only make it cheaper, but also to make it count more for millions of families and the communities where they live.”

Family remittances have a direct impact on the lives of more than one billion people – one out of seven individuals on earth. Allowing greater access to digital technology provides the key to keeping remittances flowing and lifting millions of rural people out of poverty.
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