UN / WOMEN IN PEACEKEEPING

28-Apr-2021 00:01:53
Under-Secretary-General for Peace Operations Jean-Pierre Lacroix said increasing the number of women in peacekeeping “is not enough,” and stressed the need to “transform our institutions and the way we do things.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / WOMEN IN PEACEKEEPING
TRT: 01:53
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 28 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

28 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jean-Pierre Lacroix, Under-Secretary-General for Peace Operations, United Nations:
“Increasing the number of women deployed is not enough. We need to transform our institutions and the way we do things to ensure that women can participate and contribute fully as part of our peace operations. And the Elsie initiative has been an essential partner in providing support and resources to achieve this goal, both to troop and police contributing countries and to UN-led initiatives.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

3. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

28 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jean-Pierre Lacroix, Under-Secretary-General for Peace Operations, United Nations:
“One way of promoting women’s participation in peace operations is by recognizing women’s contributions in the different roles and positions in which they currently serve in our missions. This includes steering public discourse away from the discussion on “women’s added value,” a discussion that often places a burden on justification of women, and indeed it seems to be questioning the reality that women can fill any position in peacekeeping as well or better than men, which is what we see every single day in or field missions.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

5. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

28 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Phumzile Mlambo, Executive Director, UN Women:
“We cannot wait for ten years, for instance, for gender parity to be reached by military troops. It is estimated that it will take twelve years for formed police units to reach parity; eight years for individual police officers; and seven years for military observers and staff officers. So, with the good experience that we have, we should be able to condense these statistics and move even quicker.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

7. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters
STORYLINE
Under-Secretary-General for Peace Operations Jean-Pierre Lacroix today (28 Apr) said increasing the number of women in peacekeeping “is not enough,” and stressed the need to “transform our institutions and the way we do things.”

Lacroix said the Elsie Initiative, a UN Trust Fund that supports uniformed women’s deployment to peace operations, “has been an essential partner in providing support and resources to achieve this goal, both to troop and police contributing countries and to UN-led initiatives.”

Lacroix said, “one way of promoting women’s participation in peace operations is by recognizing women’s contributions in the different roles and positions in which they currently serve in our missions. This includes steering public discourse away from the discussion on “women’s added value,” a discussion that often places a burden on justification of women, and indeed it seems to be questioning the reality that women can fill any position in peacekeeping as well or better than men, which is what we see every single day in or field missions.”

While progress has been made towards achieving the military and police gender targets set in the UN’s Uniformed Gender Parity Strategy, UN Women warned that if progress continues at the current pace, it will take 30 years to reach gender parity for military troops, 12 years for formed police units, eight years for individual police officers, and seven years for military observers and staff officers.

The Executive Director of UN Women, Phumzile Mlambo, in her address to the event said, “with the good experience that we have, we should be able to condense these statistics and move even quicker.”

The Elsie Initiative announced its first five recipients - Liberia, Mexico, Niger, Senegal and Sierra Leone - during a high-level virtual event. The Fund, which is managed by UN Women, also launched its Second Programming Round at the event. Created in 2019, the Elsie Initiative Fund for Uniformed Women in Peace Operations has so far received $27.9 million in contributions and pledges from Australia, Canada, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the United Kingdom. It seeks additional funding to help accelerate the pace of change towards the increased meaningful participation of uniformed women in UN peace operations.
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