UN / MINE ACTION

08-Apr-2021 00:02:41
Secretary-General António Guterres told the Security Council that as conflict has become more urbanized, “armed groups are proliferating and the use of improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, is increasing.” Access and mobility hurdles due to COVID-19, he added, are “complicating efforts to mitigate and respond to the threat.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / MINE ACTION
TRT: 02:41
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 08 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters

08 APRIL 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiple screens
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Conflict has become more urbanized, armed groups are proliferating and the use of improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, is increasing. All these factors complicate efforts to mitigate and respond to the threat – which, in the past year, has been exacerbated by access and mobility hurdles due to COVID-19.”
4. Multiple screens
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Mine action is an essential first step towards peace and stability. Deminers are often the first to enter cities and villages after ceasefires, clearing schools and hospitals, or allowing for critical repairs to water or sanitation infrastructure. Mine action enables the safe and voluntary return of refugees and internally displaced persons. And mine action can support political and peace processes.”
6. Multiple screens
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Whether clearing roads to farmland, routes to alternative youth employment, or access to services for victims and persons with disabilities, mine action can lay the groundwork for sustainable development and inclusion. I urge this Council to strengthen efforts to further integrate mine action into relevant resolutions, reporting and sanctions regimes.”
8. Multiple screens
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Yeoh, Goodwill Ambassador, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP):
“In 2020, nearly 19,000 deaths and injuries were recorded across the world as a result of the use of explosive weapons. Civilians continue to suffer disproportionally, accounting for 59 percent of total casualties. In countries like Yemen or Syria, mines and other explosive ordnance hindered the safe return of millions of displaced people and blocked access to their homes and agricultural fields, depriving them of opportunities to rebuild their lives.”
10. Multiple screens
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Nguyen Thi Dieu Linh, Provincial Programme Manager, Manager, Project RENEW:
“The international community can benefit from the experience and expertise of countries with long-term impact from explosive ordnance. While there are new conflicts, new challenges, new trials and new errors with high risk humanitarian support. We should not forget the impact of legacy weapons like those in Viet Nam and the decades of experience, knowledge and skills that have been developed through working in this part of the world for so many years.”
12. Multiple screens
STORYLINE
Secretary-General António Guterres today (8 Apr) told the Security Council that as conflict has become more urbanized, “armed groups are proliferating and the use of improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, is increasing.” Access and mobility hurdles due to COVID-19, he added, are “complicating efforts to mitigate and respond to the threat.”

Addressing a high-level debate on Mine Action, Guterres said “mine action is an essential first step towards peace and stability” as deminers “are often the first to enter cities and villages after ceasefires, clearing schools and hospitals, or allowing for critical repairs to water or sanitation infrastructure.”

Mine action, he said, “enables the safe and voluntary return of refugees and internally displaced persons. And mine action can support political and peace processes.”

The Secretary-General said, “whether clearing roads to farmland, routes to alternative youth employment, or access to services for victims and persons with disabilities, mine action can lay the groundwork for sustainable development and inclusion.”

He urged the Council “to strengthen efforts to further integrate mine action into relevant resolutions, reporting and sanctions regimes.”

In her address to the Council’s high-level debate, actor and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Goodwill Ambassador, Michelle Yeoh, said, “in 2020, nearly 19,000 deaths and injuries were recorded across the world as a result of the use of explosive weapons. Civilians continue to suffer disproportionally, accounting for 59 percent of total casualties.”

In countries like Yemen or Syria, she said, “mines and other explosive ordnance hindered the safe return of millions of displaced people and blocked access to their homes and agricultural fields, depriving them of opportunities to rebuild their lives.”

Nguyen Thi Dieu Linh, who is the Manager of project RENEW, an all-women demining team in Viet Nam, said, “the international community can benefit from the experience and expertise of countries with long-term impact from explosive ordnance.”

She said, “we should not forget the impact of legacy weapons like those in Viet Nam and the decades of experience, knowledge and skills that have been developed through working in this part of the world for so many years.”

The Council, which Viet Nam is presiding during the month of April, issued a statement emphasizing the importance of mine action and the need to enhance international efforts in this field, particularly in situations of armed conflict.
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