MOZAMBIQUE / DEVASTATING LOSS

08-Apr-2021 00:02:29
Displaced by attacks in Mozambique’s Palma, thousands of people are struggle with trauma and devastating loss, according to the UN refugee agency (UNHCR). UNHCR
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STORY: MOZAMBIQUE / DEVASTATING LOSS
TRT: 2:29
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / PORTUGUESE / NATS

DATELINE: 05-06 APRIL 2021, PEMBA, CABO DELGADO, MOZAMBIQUE
SHOTLIST
05-06 APRIL 2021, PEMBA, CABO DELGADO, MOZAMBIQUE

1. Med shot, Alue looking into camera
2. Wide shot, Alue seated
3. Wide shot, Alue walking
4. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Alue, displaced person:
“On the day of the attack, when everything happened, I was at work. When the attacks started, I fled to the bush looking for safety, but until now, I don't know where my family is.”
5. Various shots, sports hall that is now a transit center hosting IDPs
6. Wide shot, UNHCR staff distributing blankets
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Margarida Loureiro, Head of office in Pemba, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“These are people that are exhausted. They arrived by many means most of them arrived in a boat a few days ago but some also by walking. The sentiment is transversal to everyone I've been speaking with. They are highly traumatized by what they have seen by what they have experienced seeing their families, their friends being killed, seeing their houses being completely destroyed.”
8. Wide shot, displaced people at transit center
9. Close up, girl braiding woman’s hair
10. Various shots, displaced people in transit center
11. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Alue, displaced person:
“I am here in this transit centre to look for my family. My mother, my siblings and my wife.”
12. Wide shot, Alue asking people if they have seen his family
13. Med shot, Wide shot, Alue asking people if they have seen his family
STORYLINE
Displaced by attacks in Mozambique’s Palma, thousands of people are struggle with trauma and devastating loss, according to the UN refugee agency (UNHCR).

Attacks forced at least 16,000 people to flee with thousands more reported to be trapped in the coastal town following attacks by insurgents. Civilians have been arriving in Pemba, Nangade, Mueda and Montepuez by foot, road, and boat since 24 March, in the aftermath of the attack on Palma.

Thirty one-year-old Alue was at work when an attack began in Palma. He fled and could not go home to check on his family.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Alue, displaced person:
“On the day of the attack, when everything happened, I was at work. When the attacks started, I fled to the bush looking for safety, but until now, I don't know where my family is.”

Alue managed to be evacuated by plane to Pemba a few days after the attacks, however, he could not find his family. At the transit centre in Pemba he asks people if they have seen his wife, children, mother and siblings but so far has no leads. He says he will continue looking for his family until he finds them.

UNHCR said humanitarian flights that helped evacuate hundreds initially have now been suspended pending further clearance by authorities.

Three years of turmoil in the north of Mozambique has displaced nearly 700,000 inside the country – most during the last year. UNHCR warned that this number could cross the million mark by June this year if the ongoing violence does not stop.

UNHCR said it was putting in place measures to receive more arrivals in the coming days and staff are reaching areas outside Pemba to assist newly displaced people.

SOUNDBITE (English) Margarida Loureiro, Head of office in Pemba, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“These are people that are exhausted. They arrived by many means most of them arrived in a boat a few days ago but some also by walking. The sentiment is transversal to everyone I've been speaking with. They are highly traumatized by what they have seen by what they have experienced seeing their families, their friends being killed, seeing their houses being completely destroyed.”

The majority of new arrivals are women and children with few belongings, most showing signs of severe trauma following the atrocities they witnessed and worried for those relatives who were left behind. The sudden and deadly nature of the attacks left families torn apart, many still unable to leave. Among the vulnerable groups arriving in Pemba were unaccompanied children, separated families and older people.

UNHCR and its partners have been distributing relief items, including blankets and sleeping mats. Some people are being accommodated in a transit centre in Pemba, set up by the Government, while the majority of displaced people are living with relatives and friends whose scarce resources are being rapidly exhausted.
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