GENEVA / HUNGER HOTSPOTS

23-Mar-2021 00:02:22
Yemen, South Sudan and northern Nigeria are on top of the list facing catastrophic levels of acute hunger, with families in pockets of South Sudan and Yemen already in the grip of, or at risk of, starvation and death according to a new report. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: GENEVA / HUNGER HOTSPOTS
TRT: 2:22
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 23 MARCH 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations flag alley

23 MARCH 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, dais with speakers in a near-empty Room XIV in line with COVID-19 distancing measures, Palais des Nations
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, Director of Liaison Office with the UN in Geneva and Director in charge of the Office of Emergencies and Resilience, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“Acute hunger is on the rise across the world. Of course, it’s a result of a combination of factors, exacerbated by COVID-19, and in many places resulting in critical hunger situations.”
4. Wide shot, podium with speakers, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, Director of Liaison Office with the UN in Geneva and Director in charge of the Office of Emergencies and Resilience, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO): “The hotspots are identified against a background of already 34 million people worldwide living in emergency levels of acute hunger.”
6. Med shot, UNTV camera, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominique Burgeon, Director of Liaison Office with the UN in Geneva and Director in charge of the Office of Emergencies and Resilience, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
“As a result of the economic impact of COVID-19 pandemic, we also wish to flag that the economies of numerous countries in 2021 will continue to be highly vulnerable to economic shocks.”
8. Med shot, journalist taking notes, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Annalisa Conte, Director of Geneva Office, World Food Programme (WFP):
“FAO and WFP are calling for five billion dollars to provide emergency food assistance to the 34 million people facing the highest risk of famine and famine-like conditions.”
10. Med shot, row of seats, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Annalisa Conte, Director of Geneva Office, World Food Programme (WFP):
“We are particularly concerned about the situation of more than 30 million people who are already facing emergency level food insecurity. What does that mean? It means that they are on the brink of famine. These people have already depleted their assets, their livelihoods are compromised, their food consumption is already insufficient and the most of their children are already acute malnourished.”
12. Wide shot, near-empty Room XIV in line with COVID-19 distancing measures, Palais des Nations.
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Annalisa Conte, Director of Geneva Office, World Food Programme (WFP):
“To respond to such daunting situation, extraordinary resources are required. Flexible, unearmarked and frontloaded finding is needed to facilitate immediate action and avert catastrophic consequences.”
14. Med-wide shot, journalist with mask, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
15. Med shot, journalist typing on phone, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
16. Wide shot, podium with speakers and TV broadcasting, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
17. Med-wide shot, entry door opening, Room XIV, Palais des Nations
STORYLINE
Yemen, South Sudan and northern Nigeria are on top of the list facing catastrophic levels of acute hunger, with families in pockets of South Sudan and Yemen already in the grip of, or at risk of, starvation and death according to a new report.

The “Hunger Hotspots report”, launched today (23 Mar) by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Food Programme (WFP) called for urgent action to avert rising hunger and the risk of famine with severe hunger set to soar in over 20 countries in the coming months without urgent and scaled-up assistance.

“Acute hunger is on the rise across the world”, said Dominique Burgeon, Director of FAO Liaison Office with the UN in Geneva while speaking at a news conference. “Of course, it’s a result of a combination of factors, exacerbated by COVID-19, and in many places resulting in critical hunger situations.”

Although the majority of the affected countries are in Africa, acute hunger is due to rise steeply in most world regions - from Afghanistan in Asia, Syria and Lebanon in the Middle East, to Haiti in Latin America and the Caribbean.

“The hotspots are identified against a background of already 34 million people worldwide living in emergency levels of acute hunger”, said FAO’s Dominique Burgeon.

Conflict or other forms of violence may protract in parts of Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Central Sahel, Ethiopia, northern Nigeria, northern Mozambique, Somalia, South Sudan and the Sudan.

The report states that COVID-19 will continue to impact numerous countries around the world, leaving them highly vulnerable to economic shocks. Latin America is the region hardest hit by economic decline and will be the slowest to recover. In the Middle East, Yemen, Syria and Lebanon are seriously affected by a rapid currency depreciation and skyrocketing inflation.

According to FAO Director Dominique Burgeon “as a result of the economic impact of COVID-19 pandemic, we also wish to flag that the economies of numerous countries in 2021 will continue to be highly vulnerable to economic shocks.”

The “Hunger Hotspots report” concluded that conflict and COVID-19 are amongst the key drivers of acute food insecurity behind the projected rise in acute food insecurity in the 20 hunger “hotspots” between March and July 2021.

“We are particularly concerned about the situation of more than 30 million people who are already facing emergency level food insecurity”, said Annalisa Conte, Director of WFP’s Geneva Office. “What does that mean? It means that they are on the brink of famine. These people have already depleted their assets, their livelihoods are compromised, their food consumption is already insufficient and the most of their children are already acute malnourished.”

Climate extremes and la Niña-driven weather will likely continue in April and May, driving hunger in several parts of the world – from Afghanistan, Madagascar to the Horn of Africa.

Desert Locust outbreaks in East Africa and on the Red Sea Coast remain as well of concern.

Reminding of an earlier call this month to scale up actions and avert famine through a combination of humanitarian food assistance, cash and emergency livelihoods interventions, WFP’s Geneva Director said that “FAO and WFP are calling for five billion dollars to provide emergency food assistance to the 34 million people facing the highest risk of famine and famine-like conditions”.

She added that “to respond to such daunting situation, extraordinary resources are required. Flexible, unearmarked and frontloaded finding is needed to facilitate immediate action and avert catastrophic consequences.”
Category
Topical Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed210323b