SOUTH SUDAN / INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

08-Mar-2021 00:03:53
The UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) joined hands with the people of South Sudan in advocating for equal rights for women in the world’s newest country, which continues to suffer from conflict, death and massive displacement years after civil war ended. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY
TRT: 03:53
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 08 MARCH 2021, YAMBIO, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various Shots, singers at a recording studio advocating for women’s rights
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Joy Mbaraza, South Sudanese Musician:
“There are some thing women look into critically, in a different way that men cannot do. They are great influencers. That is why I say women must be part of decision making. Women, they don’t jump into making decisions; they first analyze what will be the impact on the society, on my family. They first think critically before making decision. So, when [more] women are included in decision making, you see that the decisions will be mature.”
3. Various shots, singers at a recording studio advocating for women’s rights
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joy Mbaraza, South Sudanese Musician:
“We can use music to talk about GBV [gender-based violence], we can use music to talk about economic activities, we can use music to talk about the unity of youth. We the youth, we are the future. We can use music to talk to young people, to influence them know their rights. We can use music to talk about the segregation among us.”
5. Various shots, singers at a recording studio advocating for women’s rights
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Hippai Benadita, South Sudanese Musician:
“When I was 17 years old, I was forced to get married and I didn’t know the responsibilities of the house. I tried to ask myself, getting married to a rich guy? I had two decisions: either they chase me out of my home, or I marry the guy. But when the day for dowry payment, I decided to move out of home to my uncle’s house. My father quarreled and said a lot of things. I thought he could have killed me. After a while I went and pleaded to him: ‘Father if I did you wrong, please, I am very sorry but for now really I’m not ready for marriage. I don’t even wish for any man now to ask me for my hand in marriage. So, it brought a little bit of conflict [in my own life] and that is why I also took it as an advantage to use it in my verse. Ladies are not a source of wealth, they are not a source of income. Leave a lady to focus on what she wants to achieve in future.”
7. Various shots, singers at a recording studio advocating for women’s rights.
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Joy Mbaraza, South Sudanese Musician:
“I still have the hope in my country. One day peace will come, the country will be free from war, free from tribalism, free from conflict. We shall all live in peace and I believe, with time, we are going to be united as South Sudanese people.”
9. Various shots, singers at a recording studio advocating for women’s rights.
STORYLINE
The UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) today (8 Mar) joined hands with the people of South Sudan in advocating for equal rights for women in the world’s newest country, which continues to suffer from conflict, death and massive displacement years after civil war ended.

Two young women, Joy Mbaraza and Hippai Benna, are expressing their support for women’s rights through their music

SOUNDBITE (English) Joy Mbaraza, South Sudanese Musician:
“There are some thing women look into critically, in a different way that men cannot do. They are great influencers. That is why I say women must be part of decision making. Women, they don’t jump into making decisions; they first analyze what will be the impact on the society, on my family. They first think critically before making decision. So, when [more] women are included in decision making, you see that the decisions will be mature.”

Joy believes that music gives her courage to speak up and speak out to the young people of South Sudan on issues that matter the most.

SOUNDBITE (English) Joy Mbaraza, South Sudanese Musician:
“We can use music to talk about GBV [gender-based violence], we can use music to talk about economic activities, we can use music to talk about the unity of youth. We the youth, we are the future. We can use music to talk to young people, to influence them know their rights. We can use music to talk about the segregation among us.”

Similarly, Hippai Benna, a South Sudanese singer was once forced by her family to get married when she was only 17. Today, Hippai is a staunch advocate for girls’ education, and equal rights. She draws on her own experiences to reach people through her songs.

SOUNDBITE (English) Hippai Benadita, South Sudanese Musician:
“When I was 17 years old, I was forced to get married and I didn’t know the responsibilities of the house. I tried to ask myself, getting married to a rich guy? I had two decisions: either they chase me out of my home, or I marry the guy. But when the day for dowry payment, I decided to move out of home to my uncle’s house. My father quarreled and said a lot of things. I thought he could have killed me. After a while I went and pleaded to him: ‘Father if I did you wrong, please, I am very sorry but for now really I’m not ready for marriage. I don’t even wish for any man now to ask me for my hand in marriage. So, it brought a little bit of conflict [in my own life] and that is why I also took it as an advantage to use it in my verse. Ladies are not a source of wealth, they are not a source of income. Leave a lady to focus on what she wants to achieve in future.”

On this year’s International Women’s Day, commemorated on 8 March, UNMISS reiterates its commitment to doing everything in its power to empower women and support them in having an equal voice in the push for peace across South Sudan.
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