UN / SOMALIA

17-Feb-2021 00:00:53
A new UN Food and Agriculture agency (FAO) analysis said poor rainfall, flooding and desert locusts are contributing to extreme food insecurity in Somalia, threating 2.6 million people, a UN spokesperson told reporters in New York on Wednesday. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SOMALIA
TRT: 0:53
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 FEBRUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, United Nations exterior

17 FEBRUARY 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Stephane Dujarric, Spokesperson for the UN Secretary-General:
“A quick note on Somalia from the Food and Agricultural Organization which said today that more than 2.6 million people in the country are expected to be extreme food insecurity, pouring rainfall, flooding, desert locust are the main contributing factors, the situation could be worsen in the middle of the year, barring large scale and sustainable humanitarian assistance. From July to December of last year, aid reached more 1.8 million people per month on average in parts of Somalia, the large scale humanitarian government support helped to minimize the magnitude of the crisis, but more funding is needed urgently to boost the effort to reduce the new food security threats the country is currently facing.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
A new UN Food and Agriculture agency (FAO) analysis said poor rainfall, flooding and desert locusts are contributing to extreme food insecurity in Somalia, threating 2.6 million people, a UN spokesperson told reporters in New York.

Briefing journalists today (17 Feb), UN Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric said the food insecurity situation could be worsen in the middle of the year, “barring large scale and sustainable humanitarian assistance.”

Dujarric continued, “from July to December of last year, aid reached more 1.8 million people per month on average in parts of Somalia, the large scale humanitarian government support helped to minimize the magnitude of the crisis.”

He reiterated, “more funding is needed urgently to boost the effort to reduce the new food security threats the country is currently facing.”

The report, compiled by FAO’s Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit, and the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET), highlights that desert locusts will continue to pose a serious risk of damage to both pasture and crops countrywide.

It also and cites forecasts that indicate an increased likelihood of below-average rainfall during the April-June season across most of the country that will further exacerbate food and nutrition insecurity for millions.

FAO and the Somali Government emphasized the urgency to increase support for ongoing desert locust control and surveillance efforts, and to provide rapid emergency assistance over the coming months.
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