BURKINA FASO / CLIMATE CHANGE CONFLICT DISPLACED

25-Jan-2021 00:03:29
In the west African country of Burkina Faso, the displaced struggle to find a refuge from violence and the effects of climate change. After leaving their homes, where drought has become endemic, thousands of people then faced violent floods that wiped away their shelters. UNHCR
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STORY: BURKINA FASO / CLIMATE CHANGE CONFLICT DISPLACED
TRT: 2:29
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: MOORE / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 -26 NOVEMBER, 2020 / KONGOUSSI, KAYA, BURKINA FASO
SHOTLIST
25 NOVEMBER 2020, KAYA, BURKINA FASO

1. Close-up, Sayore sitting down playing with his kid
2. SOUNDBITE (Mooré) Sayoré Dramane, displaced farmer:
“My name is Sayoré Dramane.”
3. Wide of Sayore sitting down playing with his kid with his wife cleaning
4. SOUNDBITE (Mooré) Sayoré Dramane, displaced farmer:
“I left home because of insecurity. Terrorists came into our village and started killing people. That’s why we came here to Kongoussi.”
5. Walking shot of Sayore going to his shelter
6. Sayore picking up his kid
7. Drone shot of dry land
8. Drone shot of dry Sahel region
9. SOUNDBITE (Mooré) Sayoré Dramane, displaced farmer:
“It’s because of a lack of rain, and desertification, because people cut down the trees, and this is heating up the climate.”
10. Various shots, wide of camp where people are doing their daily activities

26 NOVEMBER 2020, KONGOUSSI, BURKINA FASO

11. Close up, Thierry Zinta talking with Sayore
12. SOUNDBITE (French) Thierry Zinta Thianhoun, Associate Field Officer, UNCHR:
“Climate change has become a threat multiplier. In this context, unsurprisingly, we are seeing conflict over farmland, conflict over grazing land and access to water, as well as its impact on conflict between communities and security issues.”

25 NOVEMBER 2020, KAYA, BURKINA FASO

13. Wide shot, Live stocks
14, Wide shot, Refugees getting water at a well
15. Close-up, water from the well
16. Med shot, Kids walking around gallons of water
17. Med shot, Sayore walking
18. Drone of dry land showing signs of floods
19. Close-up, refugee’s hand working the dry soil
20. Wide shot, woman working the dry soil
02 FEBRUARY 2020, KAYA, BURKINA FASO

21. Refugees sitting down, waiting

26 NOVEMBER 2020, KONGOUSSI, BURKINA FASO

SOUNDBITE (French) Thierry Zinta Thianhoun, Associate Field Officer, UNCHR:
“Imagine these people who have had to abandon everything, all their belongings, to flee insecurity, and find themselves in a situation of total despair here. And then they have to bear the brunt of a situation linked to global warming. It’s a double dose of human suffering difficult to bear.”

25 NOVEMBER 2020, KAYA, BURKINA FASO

22. Med shot, Woman walking to her shelter with a basket of fruits on her head
23. Wide shot, woman with her 2 kids walking
24. Med shot, Small child, sitting down, playing with dirt with a goat
25. Various shots, UNHCR staff talking with refugees
26. Various shots, Sayore family in their shelter
STORYLINE
In the west African country of Burkina Faso, the displaced struggle to find a refuge from violence and the effects of climate change. After leaving their homes, where drought has become endemic, thousands of people then faced violent floods that wiped away their shelters.

In Africa’s turbulent Sahel region, Burkina Faso is at the epicentre of one of the world’s fastest-growing displacement and protection crises. One out of every 20 people – amounting to more than one million people – is now internally displaced. Burkina Faso also hosts 20,000 Malian refugees, the majority of whom fled violence in 2012.

Across the Sahel, refugees, internally displaced people and their hosts are subjected to brutal violence, including rape and executions. The COVID-19 pandemic added a new layer of hardship for the refugees and further complicated efforts to support them. UNHCR is again warning that attacks by armed groups in the Sahel will lead to further displacement in a region already hosting nearly two million IDPs and hundreds of thousands of refugees.

The Sahel, which includes Niger, Mali and Mauritania, among other countries, is one of the regions most impacted by climate change in the world. This has been caused by decreased rainfall and a depletion of soil due to agricultural overexploitation and progressive deforestation of the original savannahs as a result of cutting firewood, bush fires and stray animals. To address this critical dimension of the regional crisis, UNHCR is adopting a do-no-harm approach and an eco-friendly response. It is strengthening community-based preparedness to prevent climate-related forced displacement.

UNHCR supported families who have been affected by heavy rains in Burkina Faso throughout September and October through the construction of emergency shelters and distributions of shelter kits. In the Sahel region only, over 1,200 shelters were built in different sites affected by floods and an additional 222 RHUs were built in the Dori Stadium for families who lost their homes. UNHCR also obtained from the regional authorities of the Centre North the allocation of a five-hectare land to contribute to the reduction of overcrowding in IDP sites in the city of Kaya and to facilitate the relocation of families who were residing in flood-prone areas. The Operation is also rehabilitating the Goudoubo camp from which refugee families had to flee earlier this year. The construction of shelters, security posts and WASH infrastructures started in September with the aim to relocate the first refugee households by early November.

With this year’s rainy season, which has brought particular heavy rainfalls and strong winds, UNHCR and shelter partners continue to help families affected by floods through distribution of shelter and core relief items (CRIs) and advocacy for prompt relocation to non-flood prone areas. In the city of Dori in the Sahel, nearly 200 displaced families who were living in flood prone areas will be relocated to a new site of the stadium where the on-going preparations are almost completed. In addition, in the Centre North region, the assessment of shelter needs continued allowing the identification of 7,000 vulnerable families. The provision of shelter kits is on-going, while the construction of the shelters will start shortly. Some 485 IDP households have also been provided with cash, for a total of 97,035,000 XOF (USD 175,636) to allow them to build their homes.

UPSOUND: Sayoré Dramane, displaced farmer:
“My name is Sayoré Dramane. // I left home because of insecurity. Terrorists came into our village and started killing people. That’s why we came here to Kongoussi.”
[In French: “Je me nomme Sayoré Dramane. // C'est à cause de l'insécurité. Les terroristes sont rentrés dans notre village et ont tué des gens. Voilà pourquoi nous somme venus à Kongoussi.”

Sayoré is a farmer who abandoned his crops to save his family
With his wife and four children, he sought safety elsewhere in Burkina Faso
At home he saw farming getting harder
as the arid Sahel region got even drier

SOUNDBITE: Sayoré Dramane, displaced Burkinabé:
“It’s because of a lack of rain, and desertification, because people cut down the trees, and this is heating up the climate.”
[In French: “Cela est dû à l’insuffisance des pluies et aussi à la désertification du faite que les gens coupent les arbres sa fait réchauffer le climat.”]

Burkina Faso is one of the world’s poorest countries
with a fast-growing crisis
Ongoing conflict has forced more than one million people to flee their homes
Many come from drought-hit areas where armed groups exploit tensions

SOUNDBITE (French) Thierry Zinta Thianhoun, Associate Field Officer, UNHCR:
“Climate change has become a threat multiplier. In this context, unsurprisingly, we are seeing conflict over farmland, conflict over grazing land and access to water, as well as its impact on conflict between communities and security issues.”
[In French: “Le changement climatique représente un facteur aggravant. Dans ce context, les conflits liés à la terre agricole, les conflits liés aux espaces de pâturage et à l’eau ne sauraient être tout à fait surprenants, tout comme les manifestations dans les conflits inter-communautaires ou alors sécuritaires.”]

The effects of climate change followed Sayoré here
His shelter washed away in floods last year
that damaged and destroyed the homes
of more than 1,700 displaced families in the region

SOUNDBITE (French) Thierry Zinta Thianhoun, Associate Field Officer, UNHCR:
“Imagine these people who have had to abandon everything, all their belongings, to flee insecurity, and find themselves in a situation of total despair here. And then they have to bear the brunt of a situation linked to global warming. It’s a double dose of human suffering difficult to bear.”
[In French: “Imaginez des personnes qui ont fui leur localité du fait de l’insécurité, en abandonnant tout, leurs biens, et qui se retrouvent dans une situation de désespoir total ici et qui sont encore obligés de subir une situation liée au réchauffement climatique! Cela constitute une double souffrance humaine difficile à vivre.”]

UNHCR and partners are working on sustainable solutions
and strengthening support for both host and displaced populations
Sayoré hopes to return home one day
But both here and there he faces uncertain skies
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