ECUADOR / VENEZUELAN REFUGEE STUDENT

17-Sep-2020 00:01:39
Emily, a 16-year-old refugee from Venezuela, is a top student in her new home in Ecuador. Her grades have allowed her to be chosen to be the Representative of the Student Council in her school. UNHCR
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STORY: ECUADOR / VENEZUELAN REFUGEE STUDENT
TRT: 1:39
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 20 JULY 2020, QUITO, ECUADOR
SHOTLIST
20 JULY 2020, QUITO, ECUADOR

1. Close up, Emily looking out window
2. Close up, Emily’s shoes
3. Close up, Emily typing on phone
4. Wide shot, Emily typing on phone
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“My first day of school was frightening because I didn't know anyone.”
6. Close up, Emily and mom setting up call on laptop
7. Med shot, Emily with her family
8. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Geraline Cortez, Emily’s mother:
“The situation was becoming too complicated, especially regarding food and education.”
9. Wide shot, Geraline and Emily preparing food in kitchen
10. Med shot, Geraline and Emily preparing food in kitchen
11. Various shots, Emily on conference call
12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“I won the presidency seat on the student council because I had the highest marks. I was proud to know I was chosen because of my achievements.”
13. Pan right, Emily’s report cards
14. Wide shot, Emily on rooftop
15. Close up, Emily on rooftop
16. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“I would like people to see that one can pull through despite the pandemic, even though you are not in your country. Whatever happened is in the past. You have to keep moving forward and accept what comes your way.”
17. Wide shot, Emily and family on rooftop
18. Pan right, Emily and family on rooftop
STORYLINE
Emily, a 16-year-old refugee from Venezuela, is a top student in her new home in Ecuador. Her grades have allowed her to be chosen to be the Representative of the Student Council in her school.


Emily is enrolled in a public school. At the beginning, she struggled to maintain her once high grades.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“My first day of school was frightening because I didn't know anyone.”

Emily and her family fled Venezuela, joining the five million people Venezuelans who left the country in the region’s largest exodus in recent history.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Geraline Cortez, Emily’s mother:
“The situation was becoming too complicated, especially regarding food and education.”

With a little help from her friends and a lot of effort, Emily adapted to a new environment and was soon top of her class. Because of her grades, she was chosen to be the Representative of the Student Council.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“I won the presidency seat on the student council because I had the highest marks. I was proud to know I was chosen because of my achievements.”

Now, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, she has had to adapt to a new situation again: studying from home. Emily hopes to graduate next year to pursue a career in fashion design.


SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Emily Paz, Venezuelan refugee:
“I would like people to see that one can pull through despite the pandemic, even though you are not in your country. Whatever happened is in the past. You have to keep moving forward and accept what comes your way.”

More than five million Venezuelan migrants and refugees have left their country to escape the country’s insecurity and political instability. More than 400,000 are currently living in Ecuador.

Most Latin American countries hosting Venezuelans have given children and youth access to their formal education systems, although some still do not recognize Venezuelan education certificates, while others require documents for school entry that displaced families did not bring with them.

Ecuador’s legislation, however, guarantees all children in its territory the right to study in its public schools, regardless of their nationality or migration status. Thanks to this right, at least 43,000 Venezuelan children whose families have registered as refugees are enrolled in Ecuadorian schools, according to government statistics.
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