UN / COVID-19 PEACE AND SECURITY

02-Jul-2020 00:03:47
Addressing its first open debate on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on global peace and security, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told the Security Council that the consequences can be felt in countries traditionally seen as “stable,” but stressed that it’s impacts “are particularly apparent in countries already experiencing conflict or emerging from it.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / COVID-19 PEACE AND SECURITY
TRT: 03:47
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 02 JULY 2020, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Tilt up, exterior UN Headquarters

02 JULY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

2. Multiple screens
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The COVID-19 pandemic continues to profoundly affect peace and security across the globe. The consequences can be seen even in a number of countries traditionally seen as “stable”. But the impacts are particularly apparent in countries already experiencing conflict or emerging from it – and may soon engulf others.”
4. Multiple screens
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“One hundred eighty members plus one member observer state have endorsed my call for a global cease-fire, as have more than 20 armed movements and other entities and more than 800 civil society organizations. The call yielded some positive results, but these have since expired or in some cases broken down. The Council has an important role to bring its voice and influence to bear on these situations, and I welcome your support, expressed in the resolution adopted yesterday.”
6. Multiple screens
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The pandemic has brought us all to a wide-ranging reckoning. Collective security and our shared well-being are under assault on many fronts, led by a relentless disease and abetted by global fragilities. Our challenge is to save lives today while buttressing the pillars of security for tomorrow.”
8. Multiple screens
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Maurer, President, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC):
“The ICRC has seen first-hand how COVID-19 and its economic aftershock are deepening fragility, spiking humanitarian needs, accentuating the impact of violence and conflict, opening the doors to alarming levels of stigmatization, increasing global poverty, heightening instability and tensions, and reversing hard-won development gains. It is clear that pandemics cannot be addressed solely as a health issue. Instead the precondition is a political environment which supports health systems, shores social support and humanitarian action; simultaneous emergency and development approaches, as well as fundamental change of behaviour of belligerence in conflict.”
10. Multiple screens
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kelly Craft, Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations:
“Early on President Trump rightly pointed out the unquestionable need for complete transparency and the timely sharing of public health data and information with the international community. Our recent experiences have only further underscored that important point. Timely age and sex desegregated data collection and accurate science-based analysis of the origins, characteristics, and spread of the virus all continue to be crucially important.”
12. Multiple screens
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Kelly Craft, Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations:
“We also support the Secretary-General’s call for a global cease-fire while continuing to conduct legitimate counter-terrorism operations. We call on parties to conflicts to respect existing ceasefire agreements or to conclude new agreements that would help conflict-affected communities access crucial aid and take steps to protect themselves from the virus.”
14. Multiple screens
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Zhang Jun, Permanent Representative of China to the United Nations:
“Viruses respect no borders or races. Solidarity and cooperation is the only right way. Politicizing and stigmatizing lead to nowhere. Countries should take-up responsibilities, respect the science, replace differences with unity, dispel doubts with reason, form synergies in the global fight and build a better future for all.”
16. Multiple screens
STORYLINE
Addressing its first open debate on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on global peace and security, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres today (2 Jul) told the Security Council that the consequences can be felt in countries traditionally seen as “stable,” but stressed that it’s impacts “are particularly apparent in countries already experiencing conflict or emerging from it.”

Guterres noted that one hundred eighty members plus non-member observer state have endorsed his call for a global cease-fire, as have more than 20 armed movements and other entities and more than 800 civil society organizations.

He said, “the call yielded some positive results, but these have since expired or in some cases broken down. The Council has an important role to bring its voice and influence to bear on these situations, and I welcome your support, expressed in the resolution adopted yesterday.”

The Council on Monday (1 Jul) unanimously adopted resolution 2532 (2020) demanding “a general and immediate cessation of hostilities in all situations, on its agenda.”

In his address to the Council, the President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Peter Maurer, said “COVID-19 and its economic aftershock are deepening fragility, spiking humanitarian needs, accentuating the impact of violence and conflict, opening the doors to alarming levels of stigmatization, increasing global poverty, heightening instability and tensions, and reversing hard-won development gains.”

It is clear, he added, “that pandemics cannot be addressed solely as a health issue. Instead the precondition is a political environment which supports health systems, shores social support and humanitarian action; simultaneous emergency and development approaches, as well as fundamental change of behaviour of belligerence in conflict.”

United States Ambassador Kelly Craft told the Council that “early on President Trump rightly pointed out the unquestionable need for complete transparency and the timely sharing of public health data and information with the international community.”

Craft said, “our recent experiences have only further underscored that important point. Timely age and sex desegregated data collection and accurate science-based analysis of the origins, characteristics, and spread of the virus all continue to be crucially important.”

The US Ambassador expressed support for the Secretary-General’s call for a global cease-fire, “while continuing to conduct legitimate counter-terrorism operations.”

She called on parties to conflicts “to respect existing ceasefire agreements or to conclude new agreements that would help conflict-affected communities access crucial aid and take steps to protect themselves from the virus.”

For his part, China’s Ambassador Zhang Jun said, “viruses respect no borders or races. Solidarity and cooperation is the only right way. Politicizing and stigmatizing lead to nowhere. Countries should take-up responsibilities, respect the science, replace differences with unity, dispel doubts with reason, form synergies in the global fight and build a better future for all.”

Monday’s resolution – drafted by France and Tunisia - was adopted 111 days after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 to be a global pandemic.
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