WHO / COVID-19 EBOLA

01-Jun-2020 00:04:26
A new Ebola outbreak has been identified in the western part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo following a “complex” outbreak of the virus disease in the east which, according to WHO chief Tedros Ghebreyesus “seems to be in its final phase.” WHO
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STORY: WHO / COVID-19 EBOLA
TRT: 4:26
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
FILE – GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, WHO emblem outside headquarters

01 JUNE 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The world has long benefited from the strong, collaborative engagement with the government and the people of the United States. The US government and its people’s contribution and generosity towards global health over many decades has been immense, and it has made a great difference in public health all around the world. It is WHO’s wish for this collaboration to continue.”
4. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I would certainly characterize that Central and South America in particular, have very much become the intense zones of transmission for this virus as we speak. And I don't believe that we have reached the peak in that transmission.

6. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Many, many weeks ago, the world was extremely concerned about what was going to happen in potentially South Asia or in Africa. And, to a certain extent, the situation in those two settings is still difficult, but it's stable. Clearly, the situation in many South American countries is far from stable. There's been a rapid increase in cases, and those systems are coming under increasing pressure.”
8. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead for COVID-19, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“And we know that early treatment, early identification, early oxygen support when needed, can save lives. And so these are the things that I think can reduce the potency, that can reduce the power of this virus. But if we let the virus go, it will transmit. If we let the virus go, it will infect people and it will cause severe illness and about 20 percent of people. So, the important message is that there are things that we can do to suppress transmission and to save lives.”
10. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It may not be that the virus itself is becoming less potent, it may be that we are as a community and a globe successfully reducing the number, intensity and frequency of exposure to that virus, which on the face of it, the virus then looks weaker, but it may be weaker because we're doing better. Not because the virus itself is weakening. I hope the virus is weakening. We all hope that, but we cannot at this point take that chance.”
12. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We need to be exceptionally careful not to create a sense, that all of a sudden the virus by its own volition has now decided to be less pathogenic. That is not the case at all. We also need to respect the fact that many people have fought very hard at community level, health workers and others, to suppress this virus.”
14. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead for COVID-19, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“What we know from those that are infected, so far globally is that the vast majority of people who have had COVID-19 infection will recover, without problem. There will be some individuals who have had severe disease or more severe disease or critical disease that have been in hospital for prolonged periods of time. They may have had intubation, they've had severe pneumonia, they may have had toxic shock. They may have had quite some serious, serious disease. And these individuals may have a longer effect. And so, what we need to do is follow them over time to understand how they recover and what long-term care, if any they need. So, we're just starting to learn from this.”
16. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, announced today that a new outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease has been detected near the city of Mbandaka in Équateur Province. The announcement follows a complex Ebola outbreak in Eastern DRC, which seems to be in its final phase. The new one is on the other side of the DRC, Western DRC.”
18. Wide shot, WHO officials at presser
STORYLINE
A new Ebola outbreak has been identified in the western part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo following a “complex” outbreak of the virus disease in the east which, according to WHO chief Tedros Ghebreyesus “seems to be in its final phase.”

Addressing reporters today (01 Jun) in Geneva, Tedros said the Congolese Government announced today that a new Ebola outbreak was detected near the city of Mbandaka in Équateur Province.

The Congolese health ministry had identified six cases, including four people who have died. WHO is supporting the response to this new Ebola outbreak.

Commenting on President Donald Trump’s decision to terminate the United States’ relationship with the WHO, Tedros said, “The world has long benefited from the strong, collaborative engagement with the government and the people of the United States. The US government and its people’s contribution and generosity towards global health over many decades has been immense, and it has made a great difference in public health all around the world. It is WHO’s wish for this collaboration to continue.”

Executive Director of WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme, Michael Ryan, said Central and South America have “very much become the intense zones of transmission” for COVID-19 adding that the regions had not yet “reached the peak.”

He said weeks ago the world was extremely concerned about what was going to happen in South Asia or in Africa, but “to a certain extent, the situation in those two settings is still difficult, but it's stable.” He said, “Clearly, the situation in many South American countries is far from stable. There's been a rapid increase in cases, and those systems are coming under increasing pressure.”

Ryan said the decrease in the global number of cases may “not be that the virus itself is becoming less potent, it may be that we are as a community and a globe successfully reducing the number, intensity and frequency of exposure to that virus, which on the face of it, the virus then looks weaker, but it may be weaker because we're doing better.” He hoped that the virus was indeed weakening but stressed, “we cannot at this point take that chance.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Ryan, Executive Director, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We need to be exceptionally careful not to create a sense, that all of a sudden the virus by its own volition has now decided to be less pathogenic. That is not the case at all. We also need to respect the fact that many people have fought very hard at community level, health workers and others, to suppress this virus.”

Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead for COVID-19 at WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme said early treatment, identification, and oxygen support when needed, can save lives. These are the things, she said, that “can reduce the potency, that can reduce the power of this virus.” She underscored however that “if we let the virus go, it will infect people and it will cause severe illness and about 20 percent of people. So, the important message is that there are things that we can do to suppress transmission and to save lives.”

Van Kerkhove, said based on those infected so far globally, “the vast majority of people who have had COVID-19 infection will recover, without problem. There will be some individuals who have had severe disease or more severe disease or critical disease that have been in hospital for prolonged periods of time. They may have had intubation, they've had severe pneumonia, they may have had toxic shock. They may have had quite some serious, serious disease. And these individuals may have a longer effect. And so, what we need to do is follow them over time to understand how they recover and what long-term care, if any they need. So, we're just starting to learn from this.”
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