UN / POLICY SOLUTIONS COVID-19 RESPONSE

11-May-2020 00:03:53
Speaking at the UN's Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) informal briefing entitled “Joining Forces: Effective Policy Solutions for Covid-19 Response,” the Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, said that, now more than ever, people and countries everywhere rely on the United Nations (UN) to rise to the challenges of this global pandemic. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / POLICY SOLUTIONS COVID-19 RESPONSE
TRT: 3:53
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 11 MAY 2020, NEW YORK CITY /GENEVA
SHOTLIST
FILE- NEW YORK CITY

1. Exterior shot, UN Headquarters

11 MAY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“Across our set of responses, we have a clear compass. We remain guided by the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development. The Sustainable Development Goals remain central to guiding countries on a sustainable track. As the Secretary-General has highlighted, it is in fact the unfinished business in achieving the MDGs and inadequate investments in our SDG priorities that have made so many countries - across every continent - so vulnerable to this crisis.”

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

3. Exterior shot, UN Headquarters

11 MAY 2020, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“We are all in it together. But our immediate priority is to address the needs of the most vulnerable countries and communities who risk being left behind. Allocation of our resources will pay close attention to the needs of conflict- and disaster-affected countries, Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States. Additional concessional resources for vulnerable countries, a new debt relief programme for all forms of debt as well as comprehensive and faster mechanisms to restructure debt to facilitate economic recovery and SDG achievement in developing countries are going to be critical.”

FILE – GENEVA

5. Exterior shot, WHO Headquarters
6. Close up, WHO seal on a wall

11 MAY 2020, GENEVA

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The pandemic is teaching us many painful lessons; one of them is about the importance of strong national and sub-national health systems at a foundation of the global health security and universal health coverage. Strong and resilient health systems are the best defense not only against outbreaks and pandemics, but also against the multiple health threats that people around the world face every day.”

FILE – GENEVA

8. Close up, WHO seal on a glass door

11 MAY 2020, GENEVA

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Covid-19 pandemic will eventually recede, but there cannot be going back to business-as-usual. We cannot continue to rush to find panic but let the preparedness go by wayside. As we work on responding to this pandemic, we must also work to lay the foundations for healthier, safer, fairer world and that’s how we can say “enough is enough” and “never again”.”

FILE – GENEVA

10. Wide shot, exterior, UN Geneva

11 MAY 2020, GENEVA

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“Before the pandemic hit us, the ILO was looking into the future of work during its centenary year – last year – seem an eternity ago now, we made the point, pre-pandemic, that the world is changing with extraordinary pace: we have to deal with the ecological transition, we have to deal with the ecological transition, we have to deal with the digital transition, we have to deal with the demographic transition. Those things are not going away with the pandemic. So, when we go in this new normal, we going to have to take hold on all these transition and try to bring them together so they don’t conflict and obstruct each other, so that we can build them into some sort of positive process that can take us forward on all these fronts. That’s not easy, but I think it is terribly important. We can’t postpone these challenges very much longer.”

FILE – GENEVA

12. Wide shot, exterior, UN Geneva

11 MAY 2020, GENEVA

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“We know that those who are professional care workers ae also one of most undervalued workers in the world of work. I hope that we can, you know, keep in mind the fact that we regard these people as heroes today. I hope that won’t be forgotten tomorrow. To be provocative, we give them a pat on the back today saying well done. We shouldn’t give them a slap in the face tomorrow saying just carry on as you were. And women are at the center on the question of reorganizing the care economy. I think this is fundamentally important.”

FILE – GENEVA

14. Wide shot, Geneva lake
STORYLINE
Speaking at the UN's Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) informal briefing entitled “Joining Forces: Effective Policy Solutions for Covid-19 Response,” the Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, said that, now more than ever, people and countries everywhere rely on the United Nations (UN) to rise to the challenges of this global pandemic.

“Across our set of responses, we have a clear compass,” said the Deputy Secretary-General. “We remain guided by the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development. The Sustainable Development Goals remain central to guiding countries on a sustainable track.”

She added that since the start of this crisis, the UN has mobilized to full capacity through its 131 country teams, to immediately support national authorities in developing public health preparedness, as well as response plans.

The Deputy Secretary-General noted that, going forward, we will need to keep in mind dual imperatives: to respond urgently to stem the impact of the pandemic, while also helping Governments and people respond in a way that recovers better, more resilient, future.

“We are all in it together," said Mohammed. “But our immediate priority is to address the needs of the most vulnerable countries and communities who risk being left behind. Allocation of our resources will pay close attention to the needs of conflict- and disaster-affected countries, Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States.”

Speaking at the event via videolink from Geneva, Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) said “strong and resilient health systems are the best defense not only against outbreaks and pandemics, but also against the multiple health threats that people around the world face every day.”

He also said “Covid-19 pandemic will eventually recede, but there cannot be going back to business-as-usual,” and added that “as we work on responding to this pandemic, we must also work to lay the foundations for healthier, safer, fairer world.”

“That’s how we can say enough is enough and never again,” Dr Tedros underlined.

Director-General of the International Labour Organization (ILO) also joined the event via videolink from Geneva and said “”before the pandemic hit us, the ILO was looking into the future of work during its centenary year – last year – seem an eternity ago now, we made the point, pre-pandemic, that the world is changing with extraordinary pace,” underlining ecological, digital and demographic transitions as the main drivers behind accelerating pace of change.

“Those things are not going away with the pandemic,” said Ryder. “So, when we go in this new normal, we going to have to take hold on all these transitions and try to bring them together so they don’t conflict and obstruct each other, so that we can build them into some sort of positive process that can take us forward on all these fronts.”

“We can’t postpone these challenges very much longer,” he said.

ILO’s chief also spoke about the place the care workers have in our societies.

“We know that those who are professional care workers are also one of most undervalued workers in the world of work,” said Ryder. “I hope that we can, you know, keep in mind the fact that we regard these people as heroes today. To be provocative, we give them a pat on the back today saying well done. We shouldn’t give them a slap in the face tomorrow saying just carry on as you were.”

Other participants in the event included Michelle Bachellet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ambassador Mona Juul, President of the Economic and Social Council, Qu Dongyu, Director-General of Food and Agriculture Organization, Mukhisa Kituyi, Secretary-General, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and Armida Salsiah Alisjahbana, Executive Secretary, UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
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