UN / GUTERRES COVID-19 SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT

31-Mar-2020 00:03:55
The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres launched on Tuesday a new plan to counter the potentially devastating socio-economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, calling for a “shared responsibility and global solidarity in response to the impacts of COVID-19.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / GUTERRES COVID-19 SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT
TRT: 3:55
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY

2.Med shot, UN spokesperson talking
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“The message of the report we are issuing today is clear: shared responsibility and global solidarity in response to the impacts of COVID-19. It is a call to action.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

4.Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY

5.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“It is essential that developed countries immediately assist those less developed to bolster their health systems and their response capacity to stop transmission. Otherwise we face the nightmare of the disease spreading like wildfire in the global South with millions of deaths and the prospect of the disease re-emerging where it was previously suppressed. Let us remember that we are only as strong as the weakest health system in our interconnected world. I am particularly concerned for the African continent. And I strongly encourage the G20 to move ahead with the G20 African Initiative as proposed at the summit. ”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

6.Aerial shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY

7.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“What is needed is a large-scale, coordinated and comprehensive multilateral response amounting to at least 10 per cent of global GDP. Developed countries can do it by themselves, and some are indeed doing it. But we must massively increase the resources available to the developing world by expanding the capacity of the International Monetary Fund, namely through the issuance of special drawing rights, and the other international financial institutions to rapidly inject resources into the countries that need them. Coordinated swaps among central banks can also bring liquidity to emerging economies. And debt alleviation must also be a priority – including immediate waivers on interest payments for 2020.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

8.Aerial shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY

9.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“The United Nations system is fully mobilized, providing guidance for global efforts, supporting country responses and placing our supply chains at the world’s disposal. And to support our efforts, the United Nations is establishing a new multi-partner Trust Fund for COVID19 Response and Recovery to support low- and middle-income countries to respond to the emergency and recover from the socio-economic shock. UN Resident Coordinators will be the drivers of the UN response on the ground, ensuring that the wide and diverse expertise and assets of the United Nations are used in the most efficient and effective way to support countries.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

10.Aerial shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

31 MARCH 2020, NEW YORK CITY

11.SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“The recovery from the COVID-19 crisis must lead to a different economy. Everything we do during and after this crisis must be with a strong focus on building more equal, inclusive and sustainable economies and societies that are more resilient in the face of pandemics, climate change, and the many other global challenges we face. What the world needs now is solidarity. With solidarity we can defeat the virus and build a better world.”

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

12.Aerial shot, exterior, UN Headquarters
STORYLINE
The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres launched on Tuesday (31 Mar) a new plan to counter the potentially devastating socio-economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, calling for a “shared responsibility and global solidarity in response to the impacts of COVID-19.”

“It is a call to action,” said Secretary-General António Guterres, pointing out that “we are only as strong as the weakest health system in our interconnected world.”

“It is essential that developed countries immediately assist those less developed to bolster their health systems and their response capacity to stop transmission,” said Guterres. “Otherwise we face the nightmare of the disease spreading like wildfire in the global South with millions of deaths and the prospect of the disease re-emerging where it was previously suppressed,” he added.

The new report, Shared responsibility, global solidarity: Responding to the socio-economic describes the speed and scale of the outbreak, the severity of cases, and the societal and economic disruption of the coronavirus.

“What is needed is a large-scale, coordinated and comprehensive multilateral response amounting to at least 10 per cent of global GDP,” said UN chief. “We must massively increase the resources available to the developing world by expanding the capacity of the International Monetary Fund, namely through the issuance of special drawing rights, and the other international financial institutions to rapidly inject resources into the countries that need them.”

In tackling the devastating social and economic dimensions of the crisis, the UN chief pushed for a focus on the most vulnerable by designing policies that, among other things, support providing health and unemployment insurance and social protections while also bolstering businesses to prevent bankruptcies and job losses.

I am particularly concerned for the African continent,” said Guterres calling on the G20 to “move ahead with the G20 African Initiative as proposed at the summit. ”

Guterres also called for a “coordinated swaps among central banks” in order to bring liquidity to emerging economies, and he insisted that “debt alleviation must also be a priority – including immediate waivers on interest payments for 2020.”

Secretary-General said that the UN is “fully mobilized” and is establishing a new multi-partner Trust Fund for COVID19 Response and Recovery to respond to the emergency and recover from the socio-economic shock.

Referencing the 2030 Agenda and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), he maintained that in recover from the COVID-19 crisis must lead to an economy focused on building inclusive and sustainable economies that are more resilient in facing pandemics, climate change, and the many other global challenges.

“The recovery from the COVID-19 crisis must lead to a different economy,” Guterres said. “Everything we do during and after this crisis must be with a strong focus on building more equal, inclusive and sustainable economies and societies that are more resilient in the face of pandemics, climate change, and the many other global challenges we face.”

“What the world needs now is solidarity. With solidarity we can defeat the virus and build a better world,” he said.

The report includes estimates from a host of UN agencies.

According to the UN International Labour Organization (ILO), five to 25 million jobs will be eradicated, and the United States will lose USD 860 billion to USD 3.4 trillion in labor income.

The UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) projected a 30 to 40 per cent downward pressure on global foreign direct investment flows while the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) saw a 20–30 per cent decline in international arrivals.

Meanwhile, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) anticipated that 3.6 billion people will be offline and the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) forecast that 1.5 billion students out of school.

The report calls for a large-scale, coordinated, comprehensive multilateral response that amounts to at least 10 per cent of global gross domestic product (GDP) and warns that there is no time to lose in mounting the most robust, cooperative health response the world has ever seen.
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