OHCHR / COVID-19 HUMAN RIGHTS ELDERLY

27-Mar-2020 00:01:23
Answering questions from journalists via videoconference, the spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Rupert Colville, highlighted the need to flag to authorities where elderly people live, “ensuring they're getting the help they need, and they are not simply abandoned.” OHCHR
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: OHCHR / COVID-19 HUMAN RIGHTS ELDERLY.
TRT: 01:23
SOURCE: OHCHR
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 27 MARCH 2020 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Aerial shot, Palis Wilson
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Rupert Colville, Spokesperson, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Elderly people are people. And they have exactly the same rights as other people, but they are, however, potentially well they are a very vulnerable group in terms of the disease, although as WHO has made very clear, it is not totally confined to old people at all. And, you know, it's extremely important, particularly for elderly people living alone, elderly people who have other conditions or disabilities who have Alzheimer's, that they're in extremely difficult position. So, it's essential that the authorities, I think very much this is where community groups, where human rights institutions, NGOs and so on, play an absolutely vital role in flagging, you know, where such people are living, ensuring they're getting the help they need and they are not simply abandoned. And yes, it’s absolutely criminal to abandon somebody, somebody who's infirm, helpless, unable to move or so on under these circumstances. So, you know, the elderly are one group, but of course, there are many other very vulnerable groups as well. So, it's not simply the elderly, but they have rights like everyone else.”
STORYLINE
Answering questions from journalists via videoconference, the spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Rupert Colville, today (27 Mar) highlighted the need to flag to authorities where elderly people live, “ensuring they're getting the help they need, and they are not simply abandoned.”

Colville said, “elderly people are people. And they have exactly the same rights as other people, but they are, however, potentially well they are a very vulnerable group in terms of the disease,” although he noted that the World Health Organization (WHO) “has made very clear, it is not totally confined to old people at all.”

He said, “particularly for elderly people living alone, elderly people who have other conditions or disabilities who have Alzheimer's, that they're in extremely difficult position.”

The spokesperson said it was “absolutely criminal to abandon somebody, somebody who's infirm, helpless, unable to move or so on under these circumstances.”
Category
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed200327d