GENEVA / LIBYA SALAME

28-Feb-2020 00:02:54
UN Special Representative for Libya Ghassan Salamé said the escalation in violence over the last 24 hours in the country was “unacceptable” and warned that “shelling civilian areas could amount to war crimes.” UNIFEED / UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / LIBYA SALAME
TRT: 2:54
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 28 FEBRUARY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior

28 FEBRUARY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Pan left, Salamé walking to podium
3. Wide shot, Salamé at podium
4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“I warn from this downfall away from the truce which was accepted by both parties on 12 January. I say that this escalation is unacceptable, that shelling civilian areas could amount to war crimes, and that shelling public facilities is an extremely dangerous thing which is not accepted under international humanitarian law. I add that there are dangers that the war in Libya could turn into a regional war on the Libyan territory due to the direct and indirect involvement of non-Libyan parties in the fighting.”
5. Close up, Salamé on preview screen of camera
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“Why are we in a hurry. Why don’t we listen to all those people who say: ‘why don’t you do this before? Why don’t we wait [for] what happens in the other tracks before?’ Because I’m worried, Because the Libyans are worried. Because the Libyans keep asking me: ‘Don’t waste any time.’ So, I ask those who are calling for a report of these talks to talk to the Libyans, and not to me, and to stop writing me letters every single day with new conditions; to talk to the Libyans, to their fellow Libyans, and to explain to them that they should sustain shelling and war and the closure of their port and airport before they decide to make us the grace and honour of coming here. We are pursuing our line despite the procrastination of these cynics.”
7. Close up, photographer
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“I do believe that there are players who are now very active in both Syria and Libya. And I do believe that there is a mutual sort of interaction between the two conflicts that is not favourable for peace in either one.”
9. Close up, journalist taking notes
10. Med shot, videographers
11. Med shot, journalists
13. Wide shot, Salamé leaving podium
STORYLINE
UN Special Representative for Libya Ghassan Salamé said the escalation in violence over the last 24 hours in the country was “unacceptable” and warned that “shelling civilian areas could amount to war crimes.”

Speaking to reporters in Geneva today (28 Feb), Salamé warned that the truce agreed by the parties last month was under threat, adding that shelling hit many areas in and around the capital Tripoli. He said yesterday five members of the same family were killed in the shelling and the international airport in Tripoli was hit this morning with several shells leading to the destruction of important parts of the airport. He said shelling public facilities “is an extremely dangerous thing which is not accepted under international humanitarian law” adding that “there are dangers that the war in Libya could turn into a regional war on the Libyan territory due to the direct and indirect involvement of non-Libyan parties in the fighting.”

Salamé said the UN mission in Libya (UNSMIL) was moving forward on the three-track approach it has taken in applying the conclusions of the Berlin Conference. He said the economic track was going well, and the on the military track, a document was sent back for discussion with leaders. As for the political track, Salamé said the UN team was surprised - after everything was agreed for a meeting on the 26th of February – that some were asked to leave, and others put last minute conditions that were impossible to meet. He said, still those who stayed decided that the opportunity was too rare to miss, and this resulted in three days of fruitful discussions.

In response to questions, The Special Representative said the Speaker of the House of the High State Council asked for a report of the talks and put new conditions to participate in the talks that were not previously mentioned. Still, he said seven of the 13 members of the House participating in the talks remained in Geneva despite the call for a boycott.

SOUNDBITE (English) Ghassan Salamé, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya:
“Why are we in a hurry. Why don’t we listen to all those people who say: ‘why don’t you do this before? Why don’t we wait [for] what happens in the other tracks before?’ Because I’m worried, Because the Libyans are worried. Because the Libyans keep asking me: ‘Don’t waste any time.’ So, I ask those who are calling for a report of these talks to talk to the Libyans, and not to me, and to stop writing me letters every single day with new conditions; to talk to the Libyans, to their fellow Libyans, and to explain to them that they should sustain shelling and war and the closure of their port and airport before they decide to make us the grace and honour of coming here. We are pursuing our line despite the procrastination of these cynics.”

Responding to a question on the links between the Syrian and Libyan conflicts, Salamé said, “I do believe that there are players who are now very active in both Syria and Libya. And I do believe that there is a mutual sort of interaction between the two conflicts that is not favourable for peace in either one.”
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