WHO / COVID-19 UPDATE

12-Feb-2020 00:05:57
“This outbreak is a test of solidarity -- political, financial and scientific. We need to come together to fight a common enemy that does not respect borders, ensure that we have the resources necessary to bring this outbreak to an end and bring our best science to the forefront to find shared answers to shared problems. Research is an integral part of the outbreak response,” said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. WHO
Size
Format
Acquire
849.41 MB
1080p/29.97
850.21 MB
1080i/29.97
849.01 MB
1080i/25
DESCRIPTION
STORY: WHO / COVID-19 UPDATE
TRT: 5:57
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 FEBRUARY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1.Various shots, press briefing room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“As you know, the research and innovation forum on COVID-19 concluded this afternoon. I was very encouraged to see the energy and the speed with which the global research community has taken up this challenge. As we speak, research groups are meeting with the leading research funders to start work immediately on the most pressing questions. Some of these issues include easy to apply diagnostics, the best approach for infection prevention, potential therapies that could be used to treat patients, existing vaccine candidates, and how to accelerate them, and how to address the ‘infodemic’.”
3.Various shots, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Soumya Swaminathan, Chief Scientist, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We also identified transmission and epidemiology as an important priority to be studied fairly quickly because we really need to understand this virus, of course, where it originated and how it jumped to humans, but also about, its transmissibility, the age groups that it affects, what are the underlying conditions or the environmental conditions that sometimes makes this disease more severe in some people as opposed to others.”
5.Various shots, reporters
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Based on what we have been told, there are no suspected or confirmed cases of Cove with 19 onboard the Westerdam. The ship will arrive in Cambodia tomorrow morning. This afternoon I spoke to Cambodia's Minister of Health to thank him for allowing the Westerdam to dock in his country and I would like to use this opportunity to also appreciate the government, especially his excellency, the prime minister. This is an example of the international solidarity we have consistently been calling for. Outbreaks can bring out the best and the worst in people. Stigmatizing individuals or entire nations does nothing but harm the response. Instead of directing all our energy against the outbreak, stigma diverts our attention and turns people against each other. I will say it again. This is a time for solidarity, not stigma.”
7.Med shot, reporters
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I was so humbled, and I was so happy today when I sat with scientists, full of this house, everybody was using the same language. They said: we will work together. There is a common enemy and we will plan immediate actions medium and long-term and stop this outbreak. As humanity this is a common agenda to all of us. That's what they said, and they have also recognized focusing on the epicenter, and at this source, what China is doing is actually the right thing to do.”
9.Med shot, reporters
10.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael J Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“All meeting organizers have to put in place a risk management strategy in the context of there never been a zero risk. So we're advising and we're issuing advice on how to manage a mass gathering. It's very, it's easy to ask the question, should we or shouldn't we, WHO cannot become the arbiter of that process. What we can do is offer a systematized algorithm-based decision-making framework that allow each meeting to be assessed on its merits, where it's happening, who's attending and what risks can be managed.”
11. Med shot, reporters
12.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Sylvie Braind, Director, Global Infectious Hazard Preparedness, World Health Organization (WHO):
“First of all, what is important to understand. It's no more during the course of an outbreak to adapt the case definition because we need to be very close to the reality to monitor the disease, how it is unfolding. And the second thing, if I can use an image, is like fishing, although I'm not an expert at fishing, but if you want to fish a big fish, you will stick a certain type of net. If you want to fish small fishes, you will take another type of net. So it's normal to change the size of the net when you want to take a different type of fishes, and here, it's exactly the same. The situation is evolving, so when you are few cases, you have a very sensitive and specific case definition because you're really want to tackle each and every case when the situation is evolving, you change your definition just to make sure that you can monitor the disease accurately.”
13. Med shot, reporters
14.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael J Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“That shift is actually likely to generate more confirmed cases, not less. This is not an attempt to ignore cases, it's an attempt to widen the net and include milder cases and all lab confirmed cases regardless of the symptoms. So I think if anything, it's actually throwing the net even wider, with a finer mesh, and that's what we want to see in a containment phase.”
15.Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
Leading health experts from around the world have been meeting at the World Health Organization’s Geneva headquarters to assess the current level of knowledge about the new COVID-19 disease, identify gaps and work together to accelerate and fund priority research needed to help stop this outbreak and prepare for any future outbreaks.

The 2-day forum was convened in line with the WHO R&D Blueprint – a strategy for developing drugs and vaccines before epidemics, and accelerating research and development while they are occurring.

“This outbreak is a test of solidarity -- political, financial and scientific. We need to come together to fight a common enemy that does not respect borders, ensure that we have the resources necessary to bring this outbreak to an end and bring our best science to the forefront to find shared answers to shared problems. Research is an integral part of the outbreak response,” said WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “I appreciate the positive response of the research community to join us at short notice and come up with concrete plans and commitment to work together.”

The meeting, hosted in collaboration with GloPID-R (the Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness) brought together major research funders and over 300 scientists and researchers from a large variety of disciplines. They discussed all aspects of the outbreak and ways to control it including:

• the natural history of the virus, its transmission and diagnosis;
• animal and environmental research on the origin of the virus, including management measures at the human-animal interface;
• epidemiological studies;
• clinical characterization and management of disease caused by the virus;
• infection prevention and control, including best ways to protect health care workers;
• research and development for candidate therapeutics and vaccines;
• ethical considerations for research;
• and integration of social sciences into the outbreak response.

“This meeting allowed us to identify the urgent priorities for research. As a group of funders we will continue to mobilize, coordinate and align our funding to enable the research needed to tackle this crisis and stop the outbreak, in partnership with WHO,” said Professor Yazdan Yazdanpanah, chair of GloPID-R. “Equitable access – making sure we share data and reach those most in need, in particular those in lower and middle-income countries, is fundamental to this work which must be guided by ethical considerations at all times.”

During the meeting, the more than 300 scientists and researchers participating both in person and virtually agreed on a set of global research priorities. They also outlined mechanisms for continuing scientific interactions and collaborations beyond the meeting which will be coordinated and facilitated by WHO. They worked with research funders to determine how necessary resources can be mobilized so that critical research can start immediately.

The deliberations will form the basis of a research and innovation roadmap charting all the research needed and this will be used by researchers and funders to accelerate the research response.
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed200212d