WHO / TEDROS EBOLA

11-Feb-2020 00:01:42
“The world needs to continue to fund the Ebola response,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in Geneva on Tuesday, adding that “taking our foot off the accelerator now, could it be a fatal mistake.” WHO
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STORY: WHO / TEDROS EBOLA
TRT: 1:42
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 11 FEBRUARY 2020, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, press conference
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization:
“Although the world is now focused on coronavirus, we cannot and must not forget Ebola. We're very encouraged by the current trend. There have only been three cases in the past week and no cases in the past three days. But until we have no cases for 42 days, it's not over. As you know, any single case could reignite the epidemic and the security situation in Eastern DRC remains extremely fragile, so we take the progress on Ebola with caution, although it's a big success.”
3. Cutaway, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization:
“The world needs to continue to fund the Ebola response, taking our foot off the accelerator now, could it be a fatal mistake.”
5. Various shots, press conference
STORYLINE
Speaking to reporters on sidelines of the Coronavirus Forum at the World Health Organization’s Headquarters in Geneva on Tuesday (11 Feb), WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said “although the world is now focused on Coronavirus, we cannot and must not forget Ebola.”

Democratic Republic of the Congo is grappling with the world’s second largest Ebola epidemic on record, with more than 2200 lives lost and 3300 confirmed infections since the outbreak was declared on 1 August 2018.

“We're very encouraged by the current trend,” said Director-General. “There have only been three cases in the past week and no cases in the past three days.”

But, Dr. Tedros cautioned, “until we have no cases for 42 days, it's not over. As you know, any single case could reignite the epidemic and the security situation in Eastern DRC remains extremely fragile, so we take the progress on Ebola with caution, although it's a big success.”

“The world needs to continue to fund the Ebola response, taking our foot off the accelerator now, could it be a fatal mistake,” he underlined.

Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness affecting humans and other primates.

The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals, such as fruit bats, porcupines and non-human primates and then spreads in the human population through direct contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people.

The average Ebola fatality rate is around 50%. However, fatality rates have varied from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks.

The first EVD outbreaks occurred in remote villages in Central Africa, near tropical rainforests. The 2014–2016 outbreak in West Africa was the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak since the virus was first discovered in 1976. There were more cases and deaths in this outbreak than all others combined. It also spread between countries, starting in Guinea then moving across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia. It is thought that fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are natural Ebola virus hosts.
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