SOUTH SUDAN / DISPLACED FAMILIES

27-Nov-2019 00:02:34
About 600,000 people who are either internally displaced within South Sudan or living in refugee camps outside the country have returned since the peace deal was signed last September. The UN Mission in the country is assisting those who make the voluntary decision to leave with logistical support. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / DISPLACED FAMILIES
TRT: 2:34
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 21 NOVEMBER 2019, JUBA & MALAKAL, SOUTH SUDAN / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - UNMISS

1. Wide shot, Protection of Civilian Site
2. Various shots, Internally Displaced People

21 NOVEMBER 2019, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Deborah Chan Deng, Displaced Mother:
“I am filled with happiness that I am going back to my homeland. I’m very happy to be at home with my children.”
4. Various Shots, Deborah Chan Deng

21 NOVEMBER 2019, MALAKAL, SOUTH SUDAN

5. Med shot, UN plane
6. Med shot, Loading Luggage
7. Med shot, Internally Displaced People seated inside the car
8. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Deborah Chan Deng, Displaced Mother:
“That God should bring peace to South Sudan so that we can care for our children, so they can go to school and be future leaders of South Sudan when there is peace.”

FILE - UNMISS

9. Various shots, Internally Displaced People

21 NOVEMBER 2019, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

10. Wide shot, Internally Displaced People inside the bus
11. SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of UNMISS:
“Some of those have come back from neighbouring countries, some of those have gone back to their homes from within South Sudan as well. It’s great to see that happen. They’ve done that spontaneously, of their own volition. What it means is that they are getting back to their homes in time to start planting, looking after themselves, growing their own food, being not dependent on humanitarian agencies. And what we are hoping to be able to do is make sure where they are going to that they get the services that they need, like schools and health centers.”
12. Various Shots, Internally Displaced People

21 NOVEMBER 2019, MALAKAL, SOUTH SUDAN

13. Various shots, transporting Internally Displaced People
STORYLINE
The sea of white tents scattered across the camp next to the UN base in Juba has been home to tens of thousands of displaced families since civil war erupted in South Sudan six years ago.

While the residents receive food, water, healthcare and education, living conditions are less than ideal and most would prefer to be living back in their own homes. The signing of a peace deal last year has encouraged many to make the decision to leave.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Deborah Chan Deng, Displaced Mother:
“I am filled with happiness that I am going back to my homeland. I’m very happy to be at home with my children.”

Deborah Chan Deng is among a group of displaced families heading home to Malakal in the Upper Nile region. When their plane touches down on home turf, the women and children emerge to a warm welcome from family and friends they haven’t seen for many years.

The group is then transported to their homes in the town so they can settle in and begin to rebuild their lives. For Deborah and her ten children, aged between two months and 19-years-old, peace has given them the chance to make a fresh start.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Deborah Chan Deng, Displaced Mother:
“That God should bring peace to South Sudan so that we can care for our children, so they can go to school and be future leaders of South Sudan when there is peace.”

About 600,000 people who are either internally displaced within South Sudan or living in refugee camps outside the country have returned since the peace deal was signed last September. The United Nations Mission in South Sudan is assisting those who make the voluntary decision to leave its protection sites with logistical support.

SOUNDBITE (English) David Shearer, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of UNMISS:
“Some of those have come back from neighbouring countries, some of those have gone back to their homes from within South Sudan as well. It’s great to see that happen. They’ve done that spontaneously, of their own volition. What it means is that they are getting back to their homes in time to start planting, looking after themselves, growing their own food, being not dependent on humanitarian agencies. And what we are hoping to be able to do is make sure where they are going to that they get the services that they need, like schools and health centers.”

While these families feel safe enough to go home, others are more uncertain because of delays in the peace process, including a recent decision to extend the formation of a transitional government for a further 100 days.

In the meantime, UNMISS and humanitarian agencies continue to work together to provide security and services in communities so that, once people have the confidence to go home, the support they need will be waiting for them.
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