SOUTH SUDAN / MOSSO MISSION

13-Nov-2019 00:03:26
UN peacekeepers in South Sudan visited an isolated community living in extreme poverty in the backcountry of Western Equatoria. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MOSSO MISSION
TRT: 03:26
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /AZANDE /NATS

DATELINE: 13 NOVEMBER 2019, MOSSO, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, UN convoy and business trucks on the road
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Muchiri Murenga, Head of Field Office Yambio, UNMISS:
“We do this in order to make sure that we have UN presence throughout the region. And this gives some modicum of confidence to the people that there is a bright future for South Sudan with the peace that is ongoing.”
3. Various shots, Tereza working at home
4. SOUNDBITE (Azande) Tereza Andria, Resident of Mosso:
“We are suffering of poverty; to get money is a problem. If we don’t brew this local alcohol, we will not get money, and if you don’t have cassava to sell you don’t get money. Getting casual work is a problem.”
5. Close shot, Tereza’s baby
6. SOUNDBITE(Azande) Tereza Andria, Resident of Mosso:
“We need peace, so we can get our rights.”
7. Various shots, UNMISS team interacting with local community
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Muchiri Murenga, Head of Field Office Yambio, UNMISS:
“The people here understand that the peace is theirs. It is not about a process that is in Juba. It is about the process that is here in the state itself, in the villages, in the payams and that way you actually entrench [it] in people hearts and minds. And that is one of the key things; the element that will help in ensuring that South Sudan has a durable and, most of all, an inclusive peace.”
9. Various shots, convoy turning back from flooded river
STORYLINE
The peacekeepers from the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) are on a mission to visit a community which has been isolated for years due to a terrible road network and the lack of radio or telephone communication.

The extremely bad road conditions have resulted in a 24-hour journey for a patrol headed to Mosso from Yambio – nearly 120 kilometers away. On a normal day, it should take about eight hours.

Roads along this route have not been repaired since the eruption of South Sudan’s conflict in 2013. The constant use of these roads by humanitarian convoys and trucks by local traders ferrying goods for sale has further damaged it.

Traveling this road by the peacekeeping patrol to get to Mosso is crucial as it is part of an assessment mission that will report back on road conditions while also making their presence known amongst communities.

SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Muchiri Murenga, Head of Field Office Yambio, UNMISS:
“We do this in order to make sure that we have UN presence throughout the region. And this gives some modicum of confidence to the people that there is a bright future for South Sudan with the peace that is ongoing.”

With the convoy now in Mosso, the ensuing interaction reveals the hardships of these far-flung communities. Tereza Andria, a mother of four who is home cooking an evening meal explains her hardships.

SOUNDBITE(Azande) Tereza Andria, Resident of Mosso:
“We are suffering of poverty; to get money is a problem. If we don’t brew this local alcohol, we will not get money, and if you don’t have cassava to sell you don’t get money. Getting casual work is a problem.”

She hopes that there will be some respite from all the hardship she and her family are experiencing.

SOUNDBITE(Azande) Tereza Andria, Resident of Mosso:
“We need peace, so we can get our rights.”

As part of the mission, the UNMISS team on the ground took time to disseminate information on the Revitalized Peace Agreement to the local communities which have remained cut off from any communication and are not updated on the ongoing peace process.

SOUNDBITE (English) Christopher Muchiri Murenga, Head of Field Office Yambio, UNMISS:
“The people here understand that the peace is theirs. It is not about a process that is in Juba. It is about the process that is here in the state itself, in the villages, in the payams and that way you actually entrench [it] in people hearts and minds. And that is one of the key things; the element that will help in ensuring that South Sudan has a durable and, most of all, an inclusive peace.”

The assessment missions, such as these, will hopefully help communities in remote locations to benefit from information and possible road repairs. Yet, on this mission, flooded streams prevented an onward journey to villages laying further from Mosso.
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