UN / BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

05-Nov-2019 00:03:05
The High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina said the international community must help the country to go forward rather than backwards, and decried those who would try to deny the genocide that took place in Srebrenica in 1995. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
TRT: 3:05
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 05 NOVEMBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

05 NOVEMBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Pan left, Security Council members voting
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“In this political environment, we must also be concerned with potential militarization of police forces in the Republika Srpska. This sends an alarming signal to the public. The international community needs to closely monitor this issue against the separatist rhetoric and actions in BiH. We do not need a police arms race. Rather, we need less police, not more.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“But what is most reprehensible is revisionism or outright denial when it comes to the issue of genocide, which, in the case of Srebrenica, is a legal fact as confirmed in judgements of both international and domestic judicial bodies.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“Genocide was perpetrated in Srebrenica in ’95 and nothing and no one can change this fact.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“The fundamental issue that we must all consider is not only how do we help Bosnia and Herzegovina continue to face its challenges going forward, but more importantly, how do we prevent Bosnia and Herzegovina from going backwards? The current trends and various political pronouncements certainly indicate an ongoing effort to roll back the reforms that have carried the country this far.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Sven Alkalaj, Permanent Representative of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the United Nations:
“We would like to express the readiness of Bosnia and Herzegovina's authorities to continue their work in securing a better and prosperous future for its citizens, as well as our gratitude to our international partners for supporting Bosnia and Herzegovina on that path.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrej Dogan, Deputy Permanent Representative of Croatia to the United Nations:
“The current situation, as well as the rhetoric by some of the politicians, is counter-productive. It is holding the country back, and political leaders must finally acknowledge their responsibility. They owe this to their country, its peoples and citizens.”
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Ms. Marina Ivanovic, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Republic of Serbia to the United Nations:
“Serbia shares the concern of the High Representative over the destabilizing rhetoric in statements of many political leaders in Bosnia and Herzegovina and calls on all the actors, inside and outside the country, to demonstrate the necessary level of responsibility and restraint from mutual accusations. We are worried, in particular, by the taking of, or the threat to take, one-sided acts contrary to the letter and spirit of the Dayton Agreement.”
15. Zoom out, Security Council
STORYLINE
The High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina said the international community must help the country to go forward rather than backwards, and decried those who would try to deny the genocide that took place in Srebrenica in 1995.

Addressing the Security Council today (05 Nov), Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, said, “What is most reprehensible is revisionism or outright denial when it comes to the issue of genocide, which, in the case of Srebrenica, is a legal fact as confirmed in judgements of both international and domestic judicial bodies.”

He said, “Genocide was perpetrated in Srebrenica in ’95 and nothing and no one can change this fact.”
Inzko also expressed concern about the potential militarization of police forces in the Republika Srpska. He said, “This sends an alarming signal to the public. The international community needs to closely monitor this issue against the separatist rhetoric and actions in BiH. We do not need a police arms race. Rather, we need less police, not more.”

He said, “The fundamental issue that we must all consider is not only how do we help Bosnia and Herzegovina continue to face its challenges going forward, but more importantly, how do we prevent Bosnia and Herzegovina from going backwards? The current trends and various political pronouncements certainly indicate an ongoing effort to roll back the reforms that have carried the country this far.”

Sven Alkalaj, Permanent Representative of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the United Nations, said, “We would like to express the readiness of Bosnia and Herzegovina's authorities to continue their work in securing a better and prosperous future for its citizens, as well as our gratitude to our international partners for supporting Bosnia and Herzegovina on that path.”

Andrej Dogan, Deputy Permanent Representative of Croatia to the United Nations, said, “The current situation, as well as the rhetoric by some of the politicians, is counter-productive. It is holding the country back, and political leaders must finally acknowledge their responsibility. They owe this to their country, its peoples and citizens.”

Marina Ivanovic, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Republic of Serbia to the United Nations, said, “Serbia shares the concern of the High Representative over the destabilizing rhetoric in statements of many political leaders in Bosnia and Herzegovina and calls on all the actors, inside and outside the country, to demonstrate the necessary level of responsibility and restraint from mutual accusations. We are worried, in particular, by the taking of, or the threat to take, one-sided acts contrary to the letter and spirit of the Dayton Agreement.”

The Security Council also unanimously adopted a resolution authorizing the establishment, in cooperation with the European Union, the establishment for a further year of a multinational stabilization force known as EUFOR ALTHEA. Its mandate stems from the Dayton Peace Agreement signed in Paris in 1995 between the warring parties in Bosnia and Herzegovina – namely the leaders of predominantly Serbian Republika Srpska and the Bosniak-Croat Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

That pact put an end to a three-and-half-year-long war along mainly ethnic lines. Thousands were killed in fighting as well as widespread violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, including war crimes and crimes against humanity.

The Dayton Agreement established an internationally recognized state of Bosnia and Herzegovina consisting of two entities – the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska, with a three-person elected presidency.

The position of High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina was also created under the Dayton Peace Agreement with a mandate to ensure that Bosnia and Herzegovina evolves into a peaceful and viable democracy.
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