UN / WOMEN PEACE AND SECURITY

29-Oct-2019 00:03:06
After the Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution on the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda, Secretary-General António Guterres said, “the commitment that is always reflected around this table is not translating into real change around the world.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / WOMEN PEACE AND SECURITY
TRT: 03:06
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN headquarters

29 OCTOBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, Security Council vote
3. Wide shot, Council
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The commitment that is always reflected around this table is not translating into real change around the world. It is not coming fast enough or far enough. Change is coming at a pace that is too slow for the women and girls whose lives depend on it, and for the effectiveness of our efforts to maintain international peace and security.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“When we fall short, women and girls and all members of society pay the consequences.
Failure to act on women’s rights and the principles of the women, peace and security agenda brings enormous costs. Let us work together to change the narrative and improve by implementation the situation on the ground. Thank you.”
7. Med shot, Guterres at the dais
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women:
“Hostile sexist attitudes towards women were the factors most strongly associated with support for violent extremism, far more than age, degree of religiosity, level of education, or employment. This is a significant finding, especially because the vast majority of studies on terrorism ignore gender.”
9. Med shot, Guterres
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Kelly Craft, Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations:
“We cannot accept references to sexual and reproductive health, nor any references to safe termination of pregnancy or language that would promote abortion or suggest a right to abortion. The United States has stated clearly on many occasions, consistent with the 1994 ICPD Programme of Action and its report, that we do not recognize abortion as a method of family planning, nor do we support this in our women’s global assistance initiatives. The UN should not put itself in a position of promoting or suggesting a right to abortion, whether it is humanitarian or development work.”
11. Med shot, delegates
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Karen Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the United Nations:
“We’ve not seen sufficient progress in ensuring women’s meaningful participation, or in increasing the number of women in peacekeeping, nor in building an effective response to conflict-related sexual violence. In all cases, Mr President, this needs to include sexual and reproductive health services. I know that not all member states agree with this but from the perspective of the United Kingdom, SRHR and their services are a vital part of public services for women in all countries and a vital part of ensuring that women can play a truly equal role in the building of their countries.”
13. Various shots, Council
STORYLINE
After the Security Council unanimously today (29 Oct) adopted a resolution on the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda, Secretary-General António Guterres said, “the commitment that is always reflected around this table is not translating into real change around the world.”

Guterres said, change “is coming at a pace that is too slow for the women and girls whose lives depend on it, and for the effectiveness of our efforts to maintain international peace and security.”

The Secretary-General said, “when we fall short, women and girls and all members of society pay the consequences.”

He said failure to act on women’s rights and the principles of the WPS agenda “brings enormous costs” and called on Council members to “work together to change the narrative and improve by implementation the situation on the ground.”

In her address to the Council, the Executive Director of UN Women, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, highlighted the results of a research project conducted by Monash University in Indonesia, Bangladesh, Libya, and the Philippines.

The study, she said, found that “hostile sexist attitudes towards women were the factors most strongly associated with support for violent extremism, far more than age, degree of religiosity, level of education, or employment.”

This, Mlambo-Ngcuka said, “is a significant finding, especially because the vast majority of studies on terrorism ignore gender.”

During her explanation of vote, United States Ambassador Kelly Craft said her delegation “cannot accept references to sexual and reproductive health, nor any references to safe termination of pregnancy or language that would promote abortion or suggest a right to abortion.”

The United States, she said, “has stated clearly on many occasions, consistent with the 1994 ICPD Programme of Action and its report, that we do not recognize abortion as a method of family planning, nor do we support this in our women’s global assistance initiatives.”

Craft said the UN “should not put itself in a position of promoting or suggesting a right to abortion, whether it is humanitarian or development work.”

For her part, British Ambassador Karen Pierce said, “we’ve not seen sufficient progress in ensuring women’s meaningful participation, or in increasing the number of women in peacekeeping, nor in building an effective response to conflict-related sexual violence.”

In all cases, Pierce stressed, “this needs to include sexual and reproductive health services,” and added that these “are a vital part of public services for women in all countries and a vital part of ensuring that women can play a truly equal role in the building of their countries.”

The resolution adopted today, among other things, requested further information on the progress and setbacks in the WPS agenda as well as recommendations to address new and emerging challenges.

It called for the appointment of gender and/or women protection advisers to facilitate women's “full and effective participation and protection” in election preparation processes, disarmament, judicial reforms and wider post-conflict reconstruction processes.

The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to develop “context-specific approaches” for women's “full, equal and meaningful participation” in all UN-supported peace talks to ensure their inclusive involvement.
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