UN / CHILD RIGHTS TREATY

25-Sep-2019 00:02:48
Thirty years ago, world leaders made a historic commitment to the world’s children by adopting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. At a special event in New York, officials and child rights advocates celebrated progress so far while calling for greater efforts to listen to the world’s children and young people, and to act on their calls for change. UNIFEED / FILE
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STORY: UN / CHILD RIGHTS TREATY
TRT: 2:48
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 24 SEPTEMBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters

25 SEPTEMBER 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“The Convention on the Rights of the Child was a landmark achievement. For the first time, governments explicitly recognized that children have the same human rights as adults – as well as specific additional rights that recognize their special status as dependents.”
4. Wide shot, conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“This Convention is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history. We look forward to the day when all United Nations Member States give it their full backing.”
6. Wide shot, conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations:
"Peace remains their best protection. As we celebrate the success of this landmark Convention, let’s re-commit to putting children first."
8. Wide shot, conference room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Muzoon Almellehan, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador:
“Children and young people are already taking a stand. We are marching, we are campaigning, and we are speaking up for ourselves. We need you all to listen, and to act, to protect our future.”
10. Wide shot, conference room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta Fore, Executive Director of UNICEF:
“As we celebrate 30 years of the CRC, let us also commit not only to listening to children and young people. Let us support them. Let us take action with them. And 30 years from now, let us look back on this time as a time when the world committed and put concrete programmes in place to keeping our promises to children and young people. Thank you.”
12. Wide shot, conference room

FILE – SEPTEMBER 1989 – NEW YORK CITY

13. Wide shot, children in conference room
14. UPSOUND: Thank you very much. My name is Bob McGrath and you might know me better as Bob from Sesame Street where I hang out with Big Bird, and Cookie Monster, and Bert and Ernie. All of my friends on Sesame Street asked me to say hi to you and congratulations today. This is an incredible day that I know all of you know about. It’s a very big day because it’s a great day for children all over the world.
15. UPSOUND: Today, this morning, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
16. Various shots, children in conference room
STORYLINE
Thirty years ago, world leaders made a historic commitment to the world’s children by adopting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. At a special event in New York on Wednesday (25 Sep), officials and child rights advocates celebrated progress so far while calling for greater efforts to listen to the world’s children and young people, and to act on their calls for change.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the Convention was a landmark achievement. “For the first time, governments explicitly recognized that children have the same human rights as adults – as well as specific additional rights that recognize their special status as dependents.”

He said, “This Convention is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history. We look forward to the day when all United Nations Member States give it their full backing.”

The Convention on the Rights of the Child is the most rapidly ratified human rights treaty in history. More countries have ratified the Convention than any other human rights treaty in history – 196 countries have become State Parties to the Convention as of October 2015. Only the United States of America has not ratified the Convention. By signing the Convention, the United States has signalled its intention to ratify, but has yet to do so.

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan said children and young people are already taking a stand. She said, “We are marching, we are campaigning, and we are speaking up for ourselves. We need you all to listen, and to act, to protect our future.”
Almellehan was the first person with official refugee status to become an Ambassador for UNICEF.

UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore called for action to support children. She said, “30 years from now, let us look back on this time as a time when the world committed and put concrete programmes in place to keeping our promises to children and young people.”
When the Convention was adopted in 1989, the United Nations held a celebratory meeting with the participation of children from around the world. Bob McGrath from Sesame Street welcomed participants saying, “It’s a very big day because it’s a great day for children all over the world.”

The Convention Is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history – in force in virtually all countries of the world, thus providing a common ethical and legal framework for the realization of children’s rights.
It indicates that children's rights can no longer be perceived as an option, as a question of favour or kindness to children or as an expression of charity. Children’s rights generate obligations and responsibilities that we all must honour and respect.
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