WHO / CHILD AND MATERNAL MORTALITY

19-Sep-2019 00:03:16
Despite more women and their children are surviving today than ever before, a pregnant woman or newborn dies somewhere in the world every 11 seconds, according to new child and maternal mortality estimates released today by United Nations groups led by UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO). WHO
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STORY: WHO / CHILD AND MATERNAL MORTALITY
TRT: 3:16
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 SEPTEMBER 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, Exterior of WHO Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland
2. Med shot, Dr Kate Strong and Dr Doris Chou discussing the report
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Kate Strong, Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization (WHO):
"The most dangerous period of life is when you're being born, the first month of life and the majority of children under five die within that period, one third within the first day and about three quarters within the first week.”
4. Med shot, Strong being interviewed.
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Kate Strong, Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization (WHO):
“These deaths are caused by being born too early, being born too small or contracting infectious diseases or being born with congenital anomalies. Now, when you survive the first month of life then the causes of death change, so the causes of death for children under five are pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria and these are very treatable diseases that can be treated with immunizations to prevent the disease, access to care and medicines also good nutrition and safe water and hygiene.”
6. Wide shot, Dr Kate Strong and Dr Doris Chou discussing the report
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Doris Chou, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
"If a girl is 15 in 2017, her lifetime risk or her chance of dying of maternal cause throughout her lifetime is about half of what it was in the year 2000. Additionally what we are also seeing is that for all women your cause of death or what you will eventually die of, the proportion of those deaths that are now maternal is actually much declined as well moving down to about 9 per cent down from about 26 per cent. So that we are really seeing some trends that are positive."
8. Med shot, Chou being interviewed
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Doris Chou, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
"What we're seeing now is that women are still dying of things like bleeding during childbirth, high blood pressure during childbirth, known as preeclampsia, or infections that are associated with pregnancy. But what's interesting is that the proportion of deaths that are due for women, due to causes of preexisting diseases is actually on the increase, this is what we call indirect maternal causes and these are the hardest ones for health care providers to sometimes deal with because they are hard to find and detect."
10. Med shot, Chou being interviewed
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Doris Chou, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
"Pregnancy is a time where women sometimes access care for the first time, as well, so that get diagnosed with things they never knew they had. Then they and their health care practitioners, and their health care professionals need to figure out how to manage those complications or those conditions during pregnancy, and that makes it a bit complicated to deal with."

FILE - WHO – APRIL 2013, THAILAND

12.Various shots, children's hospital ward

FILE – WHO – MARCH 2016, EL SALVADOR

13.Various shots, Antenatal consultation and pregnancy
STORYLINE
Despite more women and their children are surviving today than ever before, a pregnant woman or newborn dies somewhere in the world every 11 seconds, according to new child and maternal mortality estimates released today by United Nations groups* led by UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Since 2000, child deaths have reduced by nearly half and maternal deaths by over one-third, mostly due to improved access to affordable, quality health services.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Kate Strong, Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization (WHO):
"The most dangerous period of life is when you're being born, the first month of life and the majority of children under five die within that period, one third within the first day and about three quarters within the first week.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Kate Strong, Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization (WHO):
“These deaths are caused by being born too early, being born too small or contracting infectious diseases or being born with congenital anomalies. Now, when you survive the first month of life then the causes of death change, so the causes of death for children under five are pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria and these are very treatable diseases that can be treated with immunizations to prevent the disease, access to care and medicines also good nutrition and safe water and hygiene.”

Still, the new estimates reveal that 6.2 million children under 15 years died in 2018, and over 290 000 women died due to complications during pregnancy and childbirth in 2017. Of the total child deaths, 5.3 million occurred in the first 5 years, with almost half of these in the first month of life.

Women and newborns are most vulnerable during and immediately after childbirth. An estimated 2.8 million pregnant women and newborns die every year, or 1 every 11 seconds, mostly of preventable causes, the new estimates say.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Doris Chou, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
"What we're seeing now is that women are still dying of things like bleeding during childbirth, high blood pressure during childbirth, known as preeclampsia, or infections that are associated with pregnancy. But what's interesting is that the proportion of deaths that are due for women, due to causes of preexisting diseases is actually on the increase, this is what we call indirect maternal causes and these are the hardest ones for health care providers to sometimes deal with because they are hard to find and detect."

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Doris Chou, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
"Pregnancy is a time where women sometimes access care for the first time, as well, so that get diagnosed with things they never knew they had. Then they and their health care practitioners, and their health care professionals need to figure out how to manage those complications or those conditions during pregnancy, and that makes it a bit complicated to deal with."

The estimates also show vast inequalities worldwide, with women and children in sub-Saharan Africa facing a substantially higher risk of death than in all other regions.

Levels of maternal deaths are nearly 50 times higher for women in sub-Saharan Africa and their babies are 10 times more likely to die in their first month of life, compared to high-income countries.

In 2018, 1 in 13 children in sub-Saharan Africa died before their fifth birthday– this is 15 times higher than the risk a child faces in Europe, where just 1 in 196 children aged less than 5 die.

Women in sub-Saharan Africa face a 1 in 37 lifetime risk of dying during pregnancy or childbirth. By comparison, the lifetime risk for a woman in Europe is 1 in 6500. Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia account for more than 86% of global maternal and child deaths. Countries in conflict or humanitarian crisis often have weak health systems that prevent women and children from accessing essential lifesaving care.

The world has made substantial progress in reducing child and maternal mortality. Since 1990, there has been a 56 per cent reduction in deaths of children under 15 years from 14.2 million deaths to 6.2 million in 2018. Countries in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia have made the most progress, with an 80 per cent decline in under-five deaths.

And from 2000 to 2017, the maternal mortality ratio declined by 38%. Southern Asia has made the greatest improvements in maternal survival with a nearly 60% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio since 2000.

Belarus, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Kazakhstan, Malawi, Morocco, Mongolia, Rwanda, Timor-Leste and Zambia are some of the countries that have shown substantial progress in reducing child or maternal mortality. Success has been due to political will to improve access to quality health care by investing in the health workforce, introducing free care for pregnant women and children and supporting family planning. Many of these countries focus on primary health care and universal health coverage.
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