UNICEF / AFRICA CHILDREN EDUCATION

23-Aug-2019 00:02:09
More than 1.9 million children have been forced out of school in West and Central Africa due to an upsurge in attacks and threats of violence against education across the region, UNICEF said in a new report. UNICEF
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UNICEF / AFRICA CHILDREN EDUCATION
TRT: 3:02
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTION: PLEASE CREDIT UNICEF ON SCREEN / EMBARGOED UNTIL 8:00AM GMT 23 AUGUST 2019
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 - 20 AUGUST 2019, MOPTI, MALI / FILE
SHOTLIST
20 AUGUST 2019, MOPTI, MALI
1. Med shot, UNICEF Education Officer Mamadou Sissoko teaching girls at UNICEF-supported safe learning space in Soucoura IDP camp in Mopti, Mali
2. Wide shot, UNICEF Education Officer Mamadou Sissoko at blackboard teaching
3. Med shot, UNICEF Education Officer Mamadou Sissoko teaching Hamsatou Bolly (girl) at UNICEF-supported safe learning space in Soucoura IDP camp in Mopti, Mali
4. Close up, blackboard with number of girls and boys
5. Various shots,, boys at UNICEF-supported safe learning space in Soucoura IDP camp in Mopti, Mali.
6. Various shots, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan at blackboard
7. Wide shot, schoolgirls at UNICEF-supported safe learning space in Soucoura IDP camp in Mopti, Mali.
8. Various shots, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director Charlotte Petri Gornitzka discussing with head of the Teaching Academy of Mopti.
9. Wide shot, UNICEF-supported safe learning space in Soucoura IDP camp in Mopti, Mali, with UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan walking out tent.
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director:
“So here in Mopti we have met with many displaced children who actually access to temporary education. It’s obvious here, one, that education means a lot to them, but also the real challenge and appalling situation. Because what we know is that over 900 schools have been closed down.”

19 – 21 AUGUST, MOPTI, MALI

11. Various shots, Almellehan with refugee children
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Muzoo n Almellehan, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador:
“Here in Mali there are so many children and young people who give up on education because of violence. I can tell you all those children are so inspiring, and so courageous, and they deserve to go to school because they know education is the lifeline which can help them and protect them of so many problems such as abuse and sexual exploitation. But you cannot learn when you are afraid. So help us to restore hope and to help these children to have safe places of learning like this one, to go back to education, and to deal with the trauma that they have experienced.”

FILE – UNICEF - JUNE 2019, DOUALA, CAMEROON

13. Various shots, children in classroom

20 AUGUST 2019, MOPTI, MALI

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director:
“So there’s one message: we need to invest in education, and now, and especially in situation of protracted long-term conflicts. We need education there.”

FILE – UNICEF - 28 JUNE 2019, OUGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

15. Wide shot, displaced mothers and children
16. Med shot, displaced girl and baby
17. Wide shot, displaced children playing.

FILE – UNICEF - 26 MAY 2019, BAIGAI, NORTHERN CAMEROON

18. Wide shot, children sitting under a tree
19. Various shots, children studying from a radio
STORYLINE
More than 1.9 million children have been forced out of school in West and Central Africa due to an upsurge in attacks and threats of violence against education across the region, UNICEF said today (23 Aug) in a new report.

As of June 2019, 9,272 schools were closed in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, Niger and Nigeria as a result of insecurity – triple the number recorded at the end of 2017.

Education Under Threat in West and Central Africa warns that deliberate targeting of schools, students and teachers is sweeping across the region, denying children their right to learn, and leaving them – and their communities – in fear for their lives and futures.

UNICEF Deputy Executive Director Charlotte Petri Gornitzka and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Muzoon Almellehan travelled to Mali earlier this week to witness the impact of rising insecurity and violence on children’s education and safety.

SOUNDBITE (English) Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director:
“So here in Mopti we have met with many displaced children who actually access to temporary education. It’s obvious here, one, that education means a lot to them, but also the real challenge and appalling situation. Because what we know is that over 900 schools have been closed down.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Muzoon Almellehan, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador:
“Here in Mali there are so many children and young people who give up on education because of violence. I can tell you all those children are so inspiring, and so courageous, and they deserve to go to school because they know education is the lifeline which can help them and protect them of so many problems such as abuse and sexual exploitation. But you cannot learn when you are afraid. So help us to restore hope and to help these children to have safe places of learning like this one, to go back to education, and to deal with the trauma that they have experienced.”

Insecurity spreading across northwest and southwest Cameroon has left more than 4,400 schools forcibly closed in those areas of the country. More than 2,000 schools are closed in Burkina Faso, along with more than 900 in Mali, due to an increase in violence across both countries.

In the central Sahel, Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger have witnessed a six-fold increase in school closures due to attacks and threats of violence in just over two years, from 512 in April 2017 to 3,005 in June 2019. The four countries affected by crisis in the Lake Chad Basin - Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria - stayed at roughly the same high level, varying from 981 to 1,054 between the end of 2017 and June 2019.

UNICEF is working with education authorities and communities to support alternative learning opportunities including community learning centres, radio school programmes, technology for teaching and learning, and faith-based learning initiatives. UNICEF is also providing tools for teachers who work in dangerous locations, and psychosocial support and care for school children who bear the emotional scars of violence.

Children in conflict-affected areas of West and Central Africa account for 1 in 4 children globally who need humanitarian support – including education and other services critical to learning. Yet, as of 12 August there is a funding gap of 72 per cent to provide programmes for these children.

SOUNDBITE (English) Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director:
“So there’s one message: we need to invest in education, and now, and especially in situation of protracted long-term conflicts. We need education there.”

UNICEF and partners call on governments, armed forces, parties to conflict and the international community to take concerted action to stop attacks and threats against schools, students, teachers and other school personnel in West and Central Africa – and to support quality learning for every child in the region.
Category
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed190822c