PERU / VENEZUELANS SCHOOL INTEGRATION

15-Aug-2019 00:03:04
The school “Al Aire libre” in Arequipa, Peru, is leading the way for integration of Venezuelan teachers and children who fled their own country in the past few years. UNHCR
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STORY: PERU / VENEZUELANS SCHOOL INTEGRATION
TRT: 3:04
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SPANISH /NATS

DATELINE: 21-22 JUNE 2019, AREQUIPA, PERU
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, Ramirez teaching English to Peruvian and Venezuelan kids
2. SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Niurka Ramirez, Venezuelan teacher living in Peru:
“Here, I’ve had new experiences - I feel at home, as if I were in Venezuela.”
3. Various shots, kids singing the guidance of the principal
4. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Alan Alvarez, School Principal:
"I think this is something natural, in fact they are similar to us, good professionals, very respectful people."
5. Various shots, Ramirez teaching
6. SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Niurka Ramirez, Venezuelan teacher living in Peru:
“I am only providing support to a school and working with children, I am just sharing my knowledge and thereby contributing to their future”
7. Med shot, Venezuelan boy Guillermo Misac playing the trumpet
8. Various shots, kids playing music
9. Med shot, Guillermo Misac playing the trumpet alone in a classroom
10. SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Guillermo Misac, Venezuelan:
“This workshop is very good, here I was taught what trumpet is, I already almost know everything. Things I was never taught in Venezuela. Like the different notes.”
10. UPSOUND (Spanish) Guillermo and Cristian talking together:
“Tuna is a little fruit that grows on cacti. I know what it is. They are yummy.”
11. Various shots, Guillermo and Cristian talking
12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Cristian Quintanilla, ten-year-old Peruvian student:
“We have been able to speak like civilized people and in a way to know what is going on in Venezuela, give them much needed moral support.”
13. Various shots, kids playing in school courtyard
STORYLINE
Unable to continue their education, hundreds of thousands of Venezuelan children fled their country with their families in the past years, mainly to other countries in South America.

Their integration in different educational systems in places of exile has at times been difficult. Some children and teachers have been rejected and victims of xenophobia. In some other schools, on the contrary, they have been welcomed and praised for their hard work.

Some 60 Venezuelan children add to a total of 400 students attending classes in the Al Aire School.

Teaching these students brings a sense of belonging to Niurka Ramirez, an English teacher from Venezuela.

SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Niurka Ramirez, Venezuelan teacher living in Peru:
“Here, I’ve had new experiences - I feel at home, as if I were in Venezuela.”

Alan Alvarez has been the principal of the school for the past 19 years and for him, it is just normal to help Venezuelan children access education and teachers get a job.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Alan Alvarez, School Principal:
"I think this is something natural, in fact they are similar to us, good professionals, very respectful people."

Thanks to Alvarez’s open-arms approach, Niurka Ramirez and another two Venezuelans teachers got a job in the school. But it has not always been easy for her; when she first arrived in Peru and started to work in another place, she was quickly banned from teaching because parents did not want a Venezuelan for their children. Today, even though the wound of rejection remains deep in her, she feels comfort and pride in teaching youngsters.

SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Niurka Ramirez, Venezuelan teacher living in Peru:
“I am only providing support to a school and working with children, I am just sharing my knowledge and thereby contributing to their future”

Ten-year-old Guillermo is also moving ahead. After only four months in the band, he is already their best trumpeter.

SOUNDBITE (Spnish) Guillermo Misac, Venezuelan:
“This workshop is very good, here I was taught what trumpet is, I already almost know everything. Things I was never taught in Venezuela. Like the different notes.”

Venezuelan Guillermo and Peruvian Cristian both 10, have become best friends and are happy to learn about each other’s culture.

SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Cristian Quintanilla, ten-year-old Peruvian student:
“We have been able to speak like civilized people and in a way to know what is going on in Venezuela, give them much needed moral support.”

More than four million people have been forced to flee the political crisis, collapsing economy and growing insecurity in Venezuela.
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