SOUTH SUDAN / JUBA - NIMULE ROAD PATROL

25-Jul-2019 00:03:39
Newly appointed Force Commander of United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) Lieutenant General Shailesh Tinaikar of India, led the UN peacekeepers on a patrol of a major road connecting capital Juba and the border with Uganda, where groups of armed men attack passing cars and buses. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / JUBA - NIMULE ROAD PATROL
TRT: 03:40
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH

DATELINE: 25 JULY 2019, JUBA / NIMULE, SOUTH SUDAN
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Nepalese patrol vehicles lined up
2. Med shot, Nepalse peacekeeper in gun torrent
3. Wide shot, patrol briefing
4. Med shot, patrol briefing
5. Med shot, patrol leaving base
6. Wide shot, patrol leaving base
7. Tracking shot, patrol driving through Juba
8. Various shots, crossing Juba bridge
9. Tracking shot, rural area drive by
10. Tracking shot, savannah at sunrise
11. Pan left, female peacekeeper walking by
12. Wide, shot, Force Commander speaking with SSPDF Liaison Officer
13. Med shot,Force Commander speaking with SSPDF Liaison Officer
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Lieut. Gen. Shailesh Tinaikar –Force Commander, UNMISS:
“We need to see that we are able to save lives and the only way of doing that is not by reacting. The moment fighting starts, lives will be lost. So, our principle - there are challenges - we may not be able to predict the exact place or area where violence could initiate. I think we would fail in our duty if we allow conflict to start so our main purpose is to see that conflict doesn’t start. So, in that way, we will be able to protect. We have to be nimble. We have to be proactive and we have to be very robust in our actions.”
15. Wide shot, truck driving by past parked UN convoy
16. Tracking shot, truck broken down on the roadside
17. various shots, UNMISS delegation with Nimule County Commissioner
18. SOUNDBITE (English) hon. Emilio Igga Alimas - Pageri Commissioner:
“With this confidence building, there was nothing on the road. The IO forces communicate with their counterparts – the SSPDF, they visit each other. We were sure there was no problem on the road, and indeed there was nothing on the road, except with this new development which has also surprised us. Why do some few individuals attack people on the road and who are they?”
19. Wide shot, SSPDF Commander speaking to delegation
20. Close up, SSPDF Commander speaking to delegation
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Maj. Akol Amet Amet - Commander of Second Battalion, Nimule Tiger Division:
“As you know, war is not good. Now our population is migrating to neighboring countries, so we need peace in order to return our community back to our villages. This is the confidence we need.”
22. Wide shot, Force Commander getting into driver’s seat
23. Zoom out, Force Commander driving off
24. Tracking shot, Juba street sign with motorcyclist riding under it
25. Tracking shot, people watching football match
26, Wide shot, patrol driving into UNMISS compound
STORYLINE
Peacekeepers gather before dawn for a security briefing before the convoy, protected by Nepalese troops, leaves the safety of the UN base, heading south towards the border with Uganda.

Winding its way through crowded city streets, the patrol merges with early morning commuters and crosses the only bridge spanning the Nile in Juba, the capital of South Sudan.

Gradually, the hustle and bustle of the city gives way to a peaceful rural landscape. While the natural beauty provides a stunning backdrop, the lush foliage is also the perfect sanctuary for people with sinister intent. In recent weeks, it has been a hiding place for armed gunmen attacking cars and buses, wounding and killing several travelers.

UNMISS’ new Force Commander Lieut. Gen. Shailesh Tinaikar is leading the patrol along the route to see first-hand the threat and to decide how troops can be deployed to help deter the violence.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lieut. Gen. Shailesh Tinaikar –Force Commander, UNMISS: “We need to see that we are able to save lives and the only way of doing that is not by reacting. The moment fighting starts, lives will be lost. So, our principle - there are challenges - we may not be able to predict the exact place or area where violence could initiate. I think we would fail in our duty if we allow conflict to start so our main purpose is to see that conflict doesn’t start. So, in that way, we will be able to protect. We have to be nimble. We have to be proactive and we have to be very robust in our actions.”

South Sudanese military now escort convoys of buses and trucks along the road at speed. But that carries its own risks. Vehicles that can’t handle the pace litter the roadside.
At Nimule - the town bordering Uganda - the local commissioner explains, that despite the ambushes, there have been positive developments, including rapprochements between Government and Opposition forces.

SOUNDBITE (English) Hon. Emilio Igga Alimas - Pageri Commissioner: “With this confidence building, there was nothing on the road. The IO forces communicate with their counterparts – the SSPDF, they visit each other. We were sure there was no problem on the road, and indeed there was nothing on the road, except with this new development which has also surprised us. Why do some few individuals attack people on the road and who are they?”

Some point to military defectors as a possible source of the violence. But the establishment of a new cantonment site in the area offers a fresh opportunity for opposing forces to come together as a reunified army.

SOUNDBITE (English) Maj. Akol Amet Amet - Commander of Second Battalion, Nimule Tiger Division:
“As you know, war is not good. Now our population is migrating to neighbouring countries, so we need peace in order to return our community back to our villages. This is the confidence we need.”

Mission completed, the patrol begins the 200-kilometer journey back to Juba which, on the dilapidated roads, is an arduous five-hour drive. The convoy carefully navigates its way through the evening traffic as people stop off to buy food for dinner and watch a local football match.

Returning 13 hours after they left, it’s been a worthwhile journey for the peacekeepers, who come home with a better understanding of the challenges and how to support the people they are here to serve.
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