MOZAMBIQUE / IDAI AFTERMATH

11-Jul-2019 00:04:56
When the winds started blowing on the night of March 14, reaching a maximum speed of 195 kilometers per hour, the tin roof was the first thing blown away at the Mutizo’s home. UNIFEED / WFP
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STORY: MOZAMBIQUE / IDAI AFTERMATH
TRT: 4:56
SOURCE: UNIFEED / WFP
RESTRICTIONS: FOR DRONE FOOTAGE PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: PORTUGUESE / NATS

DATELINE: 7-9 JULY 2019, BEIRA / MACOMIA, MOZAMBIQUE
SHOTLIST
WFP - 7 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

1. Aerial shot, Beira skyline
2. Various shots, buildings damaged by cyclone

UNIFEED - 7 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

3. Various shots, and her mother making cookies
4. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Teresa Mutizo, cyclone victim:
“I’m making these cookies to support us, so that we can eat. Because none of us has a job. I used to have a hair salon, that’s where I used to make money. But now, with it like this, it doesn’t help. I want to pay for water, food, the children. I don’t have a husband, he ran away when I got sick.”
4. Med shot, cooking
5. Close up, cookies in a pot
6. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Laurinda Mutizo, mother:
“The house broke. The tin roof on top, that part, broke, until we got more, looked for tin, to be able to sleep. When the rain falls, we don’t sleep. We stay like this, together.”

WFP - 8 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

5. Various aerial shots, school, partially without roof
UNIFEED - 7 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

6. Wide shot, damaged school building
7. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Frederico Francisco, school director
“Because of the cyclone, we have a problem with the classrooms, because the most of the pavilions were vandalized by the cyclone. We don’t have the tin roofs, that’s the biggest difficulty we have. We are working in sub conditions.”
8. Various shots, classroom with partially caved in roof
9. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Ivanilda Samuel, ten-year-old student:
“The classrooms broke, the tin roof flew, and we started studying again there.”
10. Wide shot, students in courtyard
11. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Simião Martins Armando, ten-year-old student:
“When there’s sun, we study like this. When it rains, we go home.”

WFP - 8 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE


12. Aerial shot, students in classrooms without roof

UNIFEED - 7 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

13. Various shots, Hortensia working in garden
14. UPSOUND (Portuguese) Hortênsia Arnaldo Abreu Júlio, singe mother of three:
“Here it’s lettuce. It was given by a friend, who lives on the other side. She gave me this lettuce. And here it’s cabbage. And there it’s onions.”
15: SOUNBDBITE (Portuguese) Hortênsia Arnaldo Abreu Júlio, singe mother of three:
“My dream, it has always been my dream, is to have a piece of land and a home. That was my dream. I would like to have a house, really, for my kids and also for me, for them to be safe. That’s the thing I want the most. I cry a lot. I used to pray to God for a piece of land. And now I thank god a lot for having this space.”
16. Wide shot, Hortensia entering her tent
17. Various shots, Hortensia and her two sons inside the tent
18. Various shots, people in camp

WFP - 8 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

19. Aerial shot, camp

WFP - 9 JULY 2019, NAKATE, MOZAMBIQUE

20. Aerial shot, village
21. Aerial shot, food distribution

UNIFEED - 9 JULY 2019, NAKATE, MOZAMBIQUE

22. Various shots, food distribution

UNIFEED - 7 JULY 2019, BEIRA, MOZAMBIQUE

23. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Peter Rodrigues, emergency coordinator, WFP:
“The cyclone changed a lot in people’s quality of life. Besides the destruction of infrastructure, the houses, the warehouses, the businesses, there was also a lot of destruction for the people who survive on fishing and agriculture.”

WFP - 9 JULY 2019, NAKATE, MOZAMBIQUE

24. Various aerial shots, food distribution
STORYLINE
When the winds started blowing on the night of March 14, reaching a maximum speed of 195 kilometers per hour, the tin roof was the first thing blown away at the Mutizo’s home.

Inside the tiny house, cobbled together with pieces of plastic, cardboard, and bricks, the 62-year Laurinda, her two adult sons, Teresa and Ernesto, Teresa’s one-year old baby and the two teenagers the family adopted years ago hugged each other.

Shortly after, Teresa’s hair salon, adjoining to the house, flew away.

Moments later, it was Ernesto’s copy house, destroying the copy machine and computer he had paid with savings he made working as a barber.

The family hoped their last livelihood, the two little machambas where Laurinda grew rice, would survive, but in the morning, they found out that had been destroyed as well.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Teresa Mutizo, cyclone victim:
“I’m making these cookies to support us, so that we can eat. Because none of us has a job. I used to have a hair salon, that’s where I used to make money. But now, with it like this, it doesn’t help. I want to pay for water, food, the children. I don’t have a husband, he ran away when I got sick.”

As the Matuzi’s found out their livelihoods had vanished, leaving only debris behind them, many others did. According to United Nations’ estimates, cyclone Idai affected 1.85 million people in the provinces of Inhambane, Manica, Tete, Zambézia and Sofala. In the city of Beira, 90% of all the infrastructure was damaged.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Laurinda Mutizo, mother:
“The house broke. The tin roof on top, that part, broke, until we got more, looked for tin, to be able to sleep. When the rain falls, we don’t sleep. We stay like this, together.”

Six weeks later, cyclone Kenneth hit the northern provinces of Cabo Delgado and Nampula, affecting more than 400 thousand people.

In Beira, Mutizos found a shelter in the nearby school 25 de Junho. That was where they lived, sleeping in crowded classrooms and eating meals distributed by UN agencies and their partners, until they could patch up their house with some damaged pieces of tin.

Frederico Francisco is the principal of the school for five thousand kids, from 1st to 9th grade. Organized in three shifts, starting at 6 am, boys and girls dressed in dark and light blue uniforms, fill classrooms which take up to 90 students.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Frederico Francisco, school director:
“Because of the cyclone, we have a problem with the classrooms, because the most of the pavilions were vandalized by the cyclone. We don’t have the tin roofs, that’s the biggest difficulty we have. We are working in sub conditions.”

The school has five different pavilions. One was completed last year, built by the community. Windows were broken and the tin roofs flew away, with the exception being some pieces that got ripped off and now hang over the students as they learn math and sciences under the sun.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Ivanilda Samuel, ten-year-old student:
“The classrooms broke, the tin roof flew, and we started studying again there.”

As Ivanilda tried to get back to normal life, so did most Mozambicans. The Mutizos are preparing “bolinhos”, a fried batter pastry, which they sell on the street with other candy. Beira was cleaned up, with the help of more than 40 trucks made available by private companies. In the areas affected by Idai, the emergency food distribution is coming to an end, after a period of three months that got extended. The same is happening at the end of July in the districts hit by the storm Kenneth.

In Beira, there is around 46 thousand people living in 15 permanent resettlement camps. In the areas affected by the second cyclone, there around 1.3 thousand.

Hortênsia Arnaldo Abreu Júlio, 26, and her three kids are one of the families who are not returning to her home. She lived in Mataquari, a neighborhood in Beira, but her house was destroyed. When the cyclone hit, she and her kids, ages 5 to 11, moved to her mom’s home. When that house became unsafe, they took refuge in her brother’s car for a couple of days. She then lived in a temporary shelter in a school and was then moved to one in a community center.She was then given a permanent place to live in the Mutuzi camp, some 40 minutes north of Beira, along with other 375 families. They live in tents given by the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, International Organization for Migration, IOM, and other partners. Many come from villages that flood constantly and were deemed no longer safe to live.

Around the tent, Hortensia was able to cultivate about a dozen different vegetables, in a few short weeks. There are beans, sweet potatoes, onions, and she has even started harvesting some greens.

“A piece of land has always been my dream," she said.

The World Food Program, WFP, emergency coordinator for Idai, Peter Rodrigues, said the agency has reached about 1.6 million. On the second phase, which will last until next crop, around March 2020, the agency is planning to help around 600 to 700 hundred of the more vulnerable people”, at a cost of USD 110 million.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Peter Rodrigues, emergency coordinator, WFP:
“The cyclone changed a lot in people’s quality of life. Besides the destruction of infrastructure, the houses, the warehouses, the businesses, there was also a lot of destruction for the people who survive on fishing and agriculture.”

The UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, lands in the country today (11 Jul), four months after the first natural disaster. He’ll meet with the president of the country, receive an updated from the agencies in the field and visit some of the affected areas.

Last month, the country hosted a donor’s conference hoping to raise $3.2 billion to facilitate the reconstruction. International donors pledged US$ 1.2 billion.
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unifeed190711a