BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA ID CARDS

17-May-2019 00:02:46
UNHCR’s tech-friendly registration process is helping thousands of Rohingya refugees getting their own identity cards, along with better protection while in exile, and the prospect of a return home one day. UNHCR
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA ID CARDS
TRT: 2:46
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ROHINGYA / NATS

DATELINE: 23 APRIL 2019, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE SETTLEMENT, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, ten-year-old Umme Habiba getting an iris scan
2. Wide shot, family at biometrics counter
3. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Nasima Aktar, Rohingya refugee:
“We want documents for Rohingyas. This is our document.”
4. Wide shot, family having their picture taken
5. Various shots, registration center
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“Having an identity is a basic human right. And remember: many of these people, all their life, did not have a proper identification. So, for them, it’s also an incredible stop into a more dignified life.”
7. Various shots, UN Refugee Chief Filippo Grandi sitting down with a family
8. Close up, a young girl
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Nurul Rochayati, Registration officer, UNHCR:
“They understand that this exercise has nothing to do with forcible return. This exercise is to establish their protection in here, and to establish their right to return. They will return in safety and dignity.”
10. Wide shot, Ahsan Ullah and his family walking out of the registration center
11. Various shots, Ahsan Ullah walking to get his family identity cards
12. Various shots, Ahsan Ullah walking away with family ID cards
13. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Nasima Aktar, Rohingya refugee:
“They say one’s love for country is a part of one’s faith. So yes, we want to go back to our country. In our minds, we know that. Over there they have tortured us, and it was impossible to bear. But if there is a safe way to go back, then we are willing to go.”
14. Various shots, family with their ID cards
STORYLINE
Iris scans, fingerprints, interviews and more: UNHCR’s tech-friendly registration process is helping thousands of Rohingya men, women and children get their own identity card, and along with better protection while in exile, and the prospect of a return home one day.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Nasima Aktar, Rohingya refugee:
“We want documents for Rohingyas. This is our document.”

The government of Bangladesh and the UN have committed to registering all Rohingya refugees as part of the Joint Government-UNHCR exercise launched in July 2018. Registration and documentation are extremely important for the Rohingya population, and the exercise provides all refugees over the age of twelve, many of whom have never had proper documents, with identity cards recognised by the government.

SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“Having an identity is a basic human right. And remember: many of these people, all their life, did not have a proper identification. So, for them, it’s also an incredible stop into a more dignified life.”

The purpose of the exercise is to update refugee information, including biometric data, and issue documents to ensure that refugees have access to proper assistance, are able to live safely in Bangladesh, and can secure eventual solutions, including exercising their right to a voluntary, safe and dignified return to Myanmar.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Nasima Aktar, Rohingya refugee:
“They say one’s love for country is a part of one’s faith. So yes, we want to go back to our country. In our minds, we know that. Over there they have tortured us, and it was impossible to bear. But if there is a safe way to go back, then we are willing to go.”

The registration exercise will provide a common, accurate and continually updated database for effective management of the humanitarian operation. The results of the registration exercise will also provide the government of Bangladesh with a better overview of the refugee population.

To date, more than 270,000 refugees have been registered. UNHCR’s goal is to have the more than 900,000 Rohingyas in Bangladesh registered with their own identity cards. The plan is to conclude the exercise by late 2019.
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