WHO / DEMENTIA

14-May-2019 00:03:28
New World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines indicate that people can reduce their risk of dementia by getting regular exercise, not smoking, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, controlling their weight, eating a healthy diet, and maintaining healthy blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels. WHO
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STORY: WHO / DEMENTIA
TRT: 3:28
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 MAY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT – GENEVA, SWIZERLAND

1.Aerial shot, exterior, World Health Organization

13 MAY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, Chowdhary being interviewed
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We now know that there are 50 million people currently worldwide with dementia. And this number is set to triple by 2050. We also know that dementia causes devastating impacts on the person with the illness, but also for family and caregivers and it has broader social and economic impacts. The cost of dementia annually is set to rise to 2 trillion US Dollars by 2030.”

FILE – WHO – AUGUST 2015, HUNG YEN, VIETNAM

4.Various shots, elderly man at a health centre

13 MAY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This rise in global numbers of people with dementia and the burden of the illness, as well as the fact that currently there is no cure for the illness makes it extremely important for us to focus our attention on reducing the risk of dementia. And that's where these guidelines are important. They provide health care providers with the information they need which is based on the latest evidence of what they can do to help people reduce their risk for this illness and they also provide governments and policymakers with the information they need for their dementia programs.”

FILE – WHO – AUGUST 2015, HUNG YEN, VIETNAM

6.Various shots, elderly man with a doctor at a health centre

13 MAY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“So the advice for the general public is that actually what is good for your heart is good for your brain. So a lot of the things that will reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease, for example, heart disease and stroke, will also reduce your risk for dementia. So doing physical activity regularly, eating a healthy and balanced diet, stopping tobacco use, reducing your alcohol consumption, paying attention to your weight, getting your blood pressure, your blood sugar levels, your cholesterol levels monitored and treated if they are raised, all these are things that will actually help you with reducing your risk of dementia later in life.”

FILE – WHO – 2008, ANNECY, FRANCE

8. Various shots, elderly woman meeting doctors

13 MAY 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We also have the Global Dementia Observatory that is a data portal and a knowledge exchange platform. The Observatory has 35 indicators, which help countries monitor how they're doing in terms of their response to dementia challenge. In the initial phase there were 21 countries that provided information on these indicators and this information is available on the WHO website and currently 80 countries are now engaged in providing information for the global dementia observatory. In addition, we have an online training platform called I-support for caregivers of people with dementia.”

FILE – WHO – 2008, ANNECY, FRANCE

10. Various shots, elderly woman meeting doctors
STORYLINE
New World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines indicate that people can reduce their risk of dementia by getting regular exercise, not smoking, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, controlling their weight, eating a healthy diet, and maintaining healthy blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We now know that there are 50 million people currently worldwide with dementia. And this number is set to triple by 2050. We also know that dementia causes devastating impacts on the person with the illness, but also for family and caregivers and it has broader social and economic impacts. The cost of dementia annually is set to rise to 2 trillion US Dollars by 2030.”

The Guidelines provide the knowledge base for health-care providers to advise patients on what they can do to help prevent cognitive decline and dementia. They will also be useful for governments, policy-makers and planning authorities to guide them in developing policy and designing programmes that encourage healthy lifestyles.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This rise in global numbers of people with dementia and the burden of the illness, as well as the fact that currently there is no cure for the illness makes it extremely important for us to focus our attention on reducing the risk of dementia. And that's where these guidelines are important. They provide health care providers with the information they need which is based on the latest evidence of what they can do to help people reduce their risk for this illness and they also provide governments and policymakers with the information they need for their dementia programs.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“So the advice for the general public is that actually what is good for your heart is good for your brain. So a lot of the things that will reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease, for example, heart disease and stroke, will also reduce your risk for dementia. So doing physical activity regularly, eating a healthy and balanced diet, stopping tobacco use, reducing your alcohol consumption, paying attention to your weight, getting your blood pressure, your blood sugar levels, your cholesterol levels monitored and treated if they are raised, all these are things that will actually help you with reducing your risk of dementia later in life.”

The reduction of risk factors for dementia is one of several areas of action included in WHO’s Global action plan for the public health response to dementia. Other areas include: strengthening information systems for dementia; diagnosis, treatment and care; supporting carers of people with dementia; and research and innovation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Neerja Chowdhary, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We also have the Global Dementia Observatory that is a data portal and a knowledge exchange platform. The Observatory has 35 indicators, which help countries monitor how they're doing in terms of their response to dementia challenge. In the initial phase there were 21 countries that provided information on these indicators and this information is available on the WHO website and currently 80 countries are now engaged in providing information for the global dementia observatory. In addition, we have an online training platform called I-support for caregivers of people with dementia.”

WHO’s Global Dementia Observatory, launched in December 2017, is a compilation of information about country activities and resources for dementia, such as national plans, dementia-friendly initiatives, awareness campaigns and facilities for care. Data from 21 countries, including Bangladesh, Chile, France, Japan, Jordan and Togo, have already been included, with a total of 80 countries now engaged in providing data.

Creating national policies and plans for dementia are among WHO’s key recommendations for countries in their efforts to manage this growing health challenge. During 2018, WHO provided support to countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Qatar, Slovenia and Sri Lanka to help them develop a comprehensive, multisectoral public health response to dementia.

Dementia is an illness characterized by a deterioration in cognitive function beyond what might be expected from normal ageing. It affects memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language and judgement. Dementia results from a variety of diseases and injuries that affect the brain, such as Alzheimer disease or stroke.
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