UN / DPRK ABDUCTIONS

10-May-2019 00:02:46
Fred Warmbier, the father of Otto Warmbier, an American college student imprisoned in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), and who was returned to the United States in a vegetative state and later died, said, “every member” of the DPRK Leader Kim Jong-un’s “regime, is a thug, he is a criminal, and he is a murderer.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / DPRK ABDUCTIONS
TRT: 02:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / JAPANESE / NATS

DATELINE: 10 MAY 2019, NEW YORK CITY / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

10 MAY 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Fred Warmbier, Father of Otto Warmbier, American College Student Imprisoned in North Korea:
“Every member of Kim’s regime is a thug, he is a criminal, and he is a murderer. It’s that simple. And unless when we sit across from these people we are able to label them correctly, we are not that. None of this room are. And it doesn’t mean we can’t engage with them. It doesn’t mean there can’t be dialogue, but when we treat them as who they really are, then we will be able to make a difference here. But until we do that this is going to be a continuous repeat. And it’s tragic, because the people that re up here they have loved ones that are being held hostage.”
4. Med shot, participants
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Fred Warmbier, Father of Otto Warmbier, American College Student Imprisoned in North Korea:
“We give him this status on the world stage, we call him a Chairman, he should be called Criminal Kim. If we are afraid to tell the truth of who we are dealing with, we don’t stand a chance at making a difference here.”
6. Wide shot, conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (Japanese) Takuya Yokota, Brother of Megumi Yokota, abducted in 1977:
“One day in November 1977 my sister Megumi was on her way back from junior high-school in Niigata City when she was simply taken away by force through violence by agents of the DPRK. She was only 13. Why on earth does an innocent civilian, a young girl at the age of only 13 have to go through such an experience? According to a former agent who has defected from North Korea, my sister was locked into a small space at the bottom of a ship and was crying and screaming, ‘mother, come help me.’”
8. Wide shot, conference room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Greg Scarlatoiu, Executive Director, Committee for Human Rights in North Korea:
“According to the Japanese government, 17 persons are listed as missing and their disappearances are believed to be attributable to the North Korean abductions. Actually, Japanese groups that investigate this issue of abductions believe that as many as 100 citizens of Japan may have been taken. News reports estimate that 200 Chinese, most of ethnic Korean background, were taken to North Korea. We also know that at least 25 other foreign citizens have been taken, and we are talking about citizens of China - mostly of Korean descent – France, Guinea, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Macao, Netherlands, Romania, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and the United States.”
10. Wide shot, conference room
STORYLINE
Fred Warmbier, the father of Otto Warmbier, an American college student imprisoned in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), and who was returned to the United States in a vegetative state and later died, today (10 May) said, “every member” of the DPRK Leader Kim Jong-un’s “regime, is a thug, he is a criminal, and he is a murderer.”

Speaking at an event organized by the Mission of Japan to discuss international cooperation to resolve the issue of DPRK abductions as a global problem, Warmbier said “it doesn’t mean we can’t engage with them. It doesn’t mean there can’t be dialogue, but when we treat them as who they really are, then we will be able to make a difference here.”

Warmbier said, “we give him this status on the world stage, we call him a Chairman, he should be called Criminal Kim. If we are afraid to tell the truth of who we are dealing with, we don’t stand a chance at making a difference here.”

Also addressing the meeting, Takuya Yokota, brother of Megumi Yokota, who was abducted from the Niigata Prefecture in Japan in 1977, said, his sister “was on her way back from junior high-school” when “she was simply taken away by force through violence by agents of the DPRK.”

He said, “she was only 13. Why on earth does an innocent civilian, a young girl at the age of only 13 have to go through such an experience?”

Showing a picture of his family before the abduction, Yokota said, “according to a former agent who has defected from North Korea, my sister was locked into a small space at the bottom of a ship and was crying and screaming, ‘mother, come help me.’”

The Executive Director of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, Greg Scarlatoiu, told the meeting that “according to the Japanese government, 17 persons are listed as missing and their disappearances are believed to be attributable to the North Korean abductions.”

While five of them were repatriated in 2002, eight — including Yokota —died in captivity, according to the DPRK government, that also alleges the other four never entered the country.
Scarlatoiu, said, “Japanese groups that investigate this issue of abductions believe that as many as 100 citizens of Japan may have been taken.”

He added that “news reports estimate that 200 Chinese, most of ethnic Korean background, were taken to North Korea” and “at least 25 other foreign citizens have been taken, and we are talking about citizens of China - mostly of Korean descent – France, Guinea, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Macao, Netherlands, Romania, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and the United States.”
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