UN / BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

08-May-2019 00:02:58
“Bosnia needs less weapons and less people in police uniforms” and its leaders “should work towards better cooperation in order to maximizing public security and a safe environment for all citizens,” said the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina Valentin Inzko in his briefing to the Security Council on Wednesday. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
TRT: 2:58
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 8 MAY 2019, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior shot, UN Headquarters
2. Wide shot, Security Council in session
3. Med shot, president of the Council
4. Med shot, Inzko speaking
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“We have also seen a continuation of divisive and destabilizing rhetoric, sometimes from the very same leaders who profess a commitment to the country's EU path. This inconsistency poses a serious challenge to BiH. While Presidency Chair Dodik has worked with his fellow Presidency Members to find agreement on several important issues, he continues to speak against the statehood of Bosnia and Herzegovina, he continues to threaten the future secession of Republika Srpska and to assert that Republika Srpska is a state! For example most recently saying that, ‘we are already separated. It just hasn't been declared yet.’ He has also stated that if Kosovo becomes a member of the United Nations, Republika Srpska would declare independence.”
6. Cutaway, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“The main Croat parties persistently reject the judgements of international courts concerning their wartime leadership and seek to revive the structures of that period's para-state. To be clear, they are rejecting the judgements of an international court, the ICTY, which was created by this very body, the Security Council, in a unanimous vote, in the year 1993.”
8. Cutaway, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“Also, earlier this year, the main Bosniak party announced its intention to launch an initiative to challenge the name of Republika Srpska before the BiH Constitutional Court, which predictably led to further threats of secession.”
10. Cutaway, delegates
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“Bosnia needs less weapons and less people in police uniforms, not more. We must do all we can to prevent a police arms race. Instead, authorities at all levels should work towards better cooperation in order to maximizing public security and a safe environment for all citizens. Immigration, refugee and asylum policy are the constitutional responsibilities of state institutions, and their capacities should be reinforced.”
12. Cutaway, delegates
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Valentin Inzko, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina:
“I cannot govern in place of the elected leaders of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Only they can take steps necessary to move the country forward. So, I invite the political leaders in Bosnia and Herzegovina to exert sincere effort to overcome their differences and finally move forward with the appointment of the State and Federation executive authorities and work with the authorities of Republika Srpska and cantons to fully implement the Dayton Peace Agreement.”
14. Wide shot, Council in session
STORYLINE
In his regular briefing to the Security Council the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina Valentin Inzko said that despite some positive steps that the Bosnian leaders have taken to move the country forward becoming a member of the European Union, “we have also seen a continuation of divisive and destabilizing rhetoric, sometimes from the very same leaders who profess a commitment to the country's EU path.”

“This inconsistency,” according to Inzko, “poses a serious challenge to BiH.”

He singled out the Serbian leader and current BiH Presidency Chair Milorad Dodik who “continues to speak against the statehood of Bosnia and Herzegovina, he continues to threaten the future secession of Republika Srpska and to assert that Republika Srpska is a state!"

High Representative quoted Dodik who reportedly recently said “We are already separated. It just hasn't been declared yet.”

According to Inzko, Dodik also stated that “if Kosovo becomes a member of the United Nations, Republika Srpska would declare independence.”

Turning to Croats, High Representative said “the main Croat parties persistently reject the judgements of international courts concerning their wartime leadership and seek to revive the structures of that period's para-state. To be clear, they are rejecting the judgements of an international court, the ICTY, which was created by this very body, the Security Council, in a unanimous vote, in the year 1993.”

The main Bosniak party, for its part, “announced its intention to launch an initiative to challenge the name of Republika Srpska before the BiH Constitutional Court, which predictably led to further threats of secession,” reported Inzko.

High Representative also condemned the Republika Srpska National Assembly’s announcement to move forward with legislation to create a reserve police force, which raised an alarm and calls for reciprocal measures within the Federation.

Inzko said “Bosnia needs less weapons and less people in police uniforms, not more.”

He called on all relevant parties to “do all we can to prevent a police arms race.”

Instead, Inzko proposed, “authorities at all levels should work towards better cooperation in order to maximizing public security and a safe environment for all citizens. Immigration, refugee and asylum policy are the constitutional responsibilities of state institutions, and their capacities should be reinforced.”

In the closing, High Representative called on the Bosnian leaders to “exert sincere effort to overcome their differences and finally move forward with the appointment of the State and Federation executive authorities and work with the authorities of Republika Srpska and cantons to fully implement the Dayton Peace Agreement.”

He said “I cannot govern in place of the elected leaders of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Only they can take steps necessary to move the country forward.”

Dayton Peace Agreement signed in Paris in 1995 between the warrying parties in Bosnia and Herzegovina – namely the leaders of predominantly Serbian Republika Srpska and the Bosniak-Croat Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, put an end to a three and half year-long war along mainly ethnic lines.

The Agreement established an internationally recognized state of Bosnia and Herzegovina consisting of two entities – the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republika Srpska, with a three-person elected presidency.

The position of High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina was also created under the Dayton Peace Agreement with a mandate to ensure that Bosnia and Herzegovina evolves into a peaceful and viable democracy.
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