COX BAZAR / HUMANITARIAN VISIT

26-Apr-2019 00:03:05
Three top UN officials witnessed operations delivering life-saving protection to nearly a million Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, from key documentation to food assistance and housing – and warned of the need for sustained support from the international community. UNHCR
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STORY: COX BAZAR / HUMANITARIAN VISIT
TRT: 03:05
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 26 APRIL 2019, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE SETTLEMENT, COX’S BAZAR, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
1. Pan right, IOM Director General António Vitorino and IOM staff walk down steps
2. Med shot, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi speaks with staff near Rohingya refugee market stands
3. Med shot, Mark Lowcock, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, speaks with IOM staff member
4. Various shots, Grandi speaking and listening to Rohingya refugee with market stand
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“The challenges are huge. Almost a million people in this small land, one of the highest population densities in the world. Very few opportunities for people. Education is still a problem.”
6. Med shot, Grandi and Vitorino
7. Close up, Vitorino
8. Pan right, Lowcock, Grandi, and Vitorino walking
9. SOUNDBITE (English) António Vitorino, Director General, IOM, the UN Migration Agency:
“When there is a will, there is a possibility of working together and making a difference in supporting and helping those who are most in need, irrespective of their status.”
10. Pan right, from children to Lowcock
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The camp is much better established. There are roads. The infrastructure is better. Everybody’s worried about the oncoming monsoon season. People are preparing for that. But there’s also a much stronger sense of calm. There are still lots of problems here, including problems that women and girls face in particular.”
12. Various shots, food items available to Rohingya refugees through WFP e-Voucher programme
13. Various shots, Vitorino, Lowcock and Grandi listening to presentation
14. Med shot, Vitorino, Lowcock and Grandi
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“We are squeezed here between the border here in Myanmar – this is where they come from – and the ocean, the Bay of Bengal. This is an area subjected to heavy rains, to the monsoon seasons, and sometimes also to cyclones. So, we are working, investigating a lot of work like we did last year, to prepare.”
16. Various shots, Grandi meeting family providing biometric data as stage in registration process
17. Various shots, Lowcock speaking with family undergoing registration process
18. Various shots, presentation by Peter Agnew, head of office for the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), about land stabilization and reforestation programme
19. Close up, Grandi
20. Close up, Vitorino
21. Close up, Lowcock
STORYLINE
Three top UN officials today (26 Apr) witnessed operations delivering life-saving protection to nearly a million Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, from key documentation to food assistance and housing – and warned of the need for sustained support from the international community.

UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock, Director General of the International Organization for Migration António Vitorino, and UN High As they visited the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar and meeting with different refugee groups, they also highlighted the critical importance of supporting the Rohingya during their time in exile, in particular by expanding opportunities for learning and skills training. They noted that almost half of the 540,000 refugee children under the age of 12 are currently missing out on education altogether, while the remainder have access only to very limited schooling. Only a handful of teenage children are currently able to access any form of education or training.

Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi reiterated their commitment to keep working toward safe and sustainable solutions for Rohingya refugees in Myanmar and noted the UN efforts there to help create conditions conducive to return.

SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“The challenges are huge. Almost a million people in this small land, one of the highest population densities in the world. Very few opportunities for people. Education is still a problem.”

Grandi called on the international community to continue supporting the critical needs of 1.2 million people in south-eastern Bangladesh, mostly Rohingya refugees but also including host communities.

Vitorino highlighted the importance of the different agencies working together to help improve the living conditions of the Rohingya refugees.

SOUNDBITE (English) António Vitorino, Director General, IOM, the UN Migration Agency:
“When there is a will, there is a possibility of working together and making a difference in supporting and helping those who are most in need, irrespective of their status.”

The UN leaders discussed with the government ways the international community can further support preparedness and response efforts. While in the camps, they also assessed the ongoing work that has been undertaken to address weather-related risks, including the strengthening of shelters, the improvement of infrastructure, and the training of volunteers. They recognised the critical role the refugees themselves are playing in these efforts.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The camp is much better established. There are roads. The infrastructure is better. Everybody’s worried about the oncoming monsoon season. People are preparing for that. But there’s also a much stronger sense of calm. There are still lots of problems here, including problems that women and girls face in particular.”

The visit also came just ahead of the cyclone period, which is followed by the monsoon season. Both pose serious risks, including flooding, landslides and disease outbreaks, to thousands of already vulnerable women, men and children.

SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“We are squeezed here between the border here in Myanmar – this is where they come from – and the ocean, the Bay of Bengal. This is an area subjected to heavy rains, to the monsoon seasons, and sometimes also to cyclones. So, we are working, investigating a lot of work like we did last year, to prepare.”

The UN leaders also met with families who were going through the joint government and UNHCR biometric registration process, receiving documents that for many are a first and that confirm their identity in Bangladesh, as well as enhance their right to access services and protection. They also witnessed an innovative World Food Programme e-voucher system which gives refugees the ability to choose from an array of locally-resourced food staples and fresh vegetables in eight designated stores.
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