WHO / MALARIA VACCINE LAUNCH

23-Apr-2019 00:03:42
The Government of Malawi in coordination with the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the world’s first malaria vaccine in a landmark pilot programme. The country is the first of three in Africa in which the vaccine will be made available to children up to 2 years of age; Ghana and Kenya will introduce the vaccine in the coming weeks. WHO
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STORY: WHO / MALARIA VACCINE LAUNCH
TRT: 03:42
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / CHICHEWA / NATS

DATELINE: 23 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / 23 APRIL 2019, LLILONGWE, MALAWI
SHOTLIST
23 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Med shot, press conference dais
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization (WHO):
“As much of a milestone as it is, it is an imperfect vaccine against a complex disease, but it's also a vaccine that has significant potential to save lives and deliver on the health aspirations that we have for all children around the world. “
3. Med shot, press conference dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The anticipation is that there will be about 360,000 children each year who will be vaccinated across the three countries.”
5. Med shot, press conference dais
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Pedro Alonso, Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The question could be well, why not wait until we have something better. Well, and the answer to that is because we know we're dealing with a very, very hard organism and that's why I mentioned before this is the first vaccine against the human malaria parasite. Parasites are really complex organisms much more so than a virus or a bacterium. And that's why he has taken 30 years to develop this first vaccine.”
7. Tilt up, journalist taking notes
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Pedro Alonso, Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I always remember when 30 years ago, we as many others were developing insecticide-treated bed nets, they were met with similar scepticism. Oh, they only prevented 40 percent of clinical malaria, oddly enough the same level that this vaccine provides. And insecticide-treated bed nets were met with significant scepticism, but data showed that they could actually have a massive impact on mortality and as such they’ve become the cornerstone, the backbone of our malaria control efforts that have resulted even over 7 million deaths being averted.”

23 APRIL 2019, LLILONGWE, MALAWI

9. Various shots, exterior of health centre
10. Various shots, child receiving vaccine
11. Med shot, crowd waiting at health centre
12. SOUNDBITE Chichewa) Alinafe Tsitsi, Mother:
“My husband’s illness from malaria prompted me to come here for the malaria vaccine, because I heard an announcement in my village that the hospital was vaccinating children against malaria, Malaria is a dangerous disease, when I saw how ill my husband was from malaria, I was concerned that if my children got ill from malaria, it would be much worse for them. I don't want my child to suffer from malaria, that is why my child is getting the malaria vaccine.”
13. Various shots, health worker drawing vaccine
14. Tilt down, mother with baby
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Kayange, Deputy-Director for malaria, Malawi Ministry of Health:
“Malaria is a huge public health problem in Malawi. We see about six million cases each year, and we register close to 3,000 deaths each year. And per day, I would say we register about eight deaths every day. So, it's quite a huge problem, a public health problem in my life. And that's why this malaria vaccine which has potential to prevent some cases and also save some lives, as a country were quite positive about it and they were happy that we're introducing this vaccine.”
16. Wide shot, people outside health centre
17. Close up, sleeping baby
STORYLINE
The Government of Malawi in coordination with the World Health Organization (WHO) today (24 Apr) launched the world’s first malaria vaccine in a landmark pilot programme. The country is the first of three in Africa in which the vaccine, known as RTS, S, will be made available to children up to 2 years of age; Ghana and Kenya will introduce the vaccine in the coming weeks.

In clinical trials, the vaccine was found to prevent approximately 4 in 10 malaria cases, including 3 in 10 cases of life-threatening severe malaria.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization (WHO):
“As much of a milestone as it is, it is an imperfect vaccine against a complex disease, but it's also a vaccine that has significant potential to save lives and deliver on the health aspirations that we have for all children around the world. “

The malaria vaccine pilot aims to reach about 360,000 children per year across the three countries. Ministries of health will determine where the vaccine will be given; they will focus on areas with moderate-to-high malaria transmission, where the vaccine can have the greatest impact.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The anticipation is that there will be about 360,000 children each year who will be vaccinated across the three countries.”

Thirty years in the making, RTS, S is the first, and to date the only, vaccine that has demonstrated it can significantly reduce malaria in children.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pedro Alonso, Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The question could be well, why not wait until we have something better. Well, and the answer to that is because we know we're dealing with a very, very hard organism and that's why I mentioned before this is the first vaccine against the human malaria parasite. Parasites are really complex organisms much more so than a virus or a bacterium. And that's why he has taken 30 years to develop this first vaccine.”

The pilot programme is designed to generate evidence and experience to inform WHO policy recommendations on the broader use of the RTS, S malaria vaccine. It will look at reductions in child deaths; vaccine uptake, including whether parents bring their children on time for the four required doses; and vaccine safety in the context of routine use.

SOUNDBITE (English) Pedro Alonso, Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“I always remember when 30 years ago, we as many others were developing insecticide-treated bed nets, they were met with similar scepticism. Oh, they only prevented 40 percent of clinical malaria, oddly enough the same level that this vaccine provides. And insecticide-treated bed nets were met with significant scepticism, but data showed that they could actually have a massive impact on mortality and as such they’ve become the cornerstone, the backbone of our malaria control efforts that have resulted even over 7 million deaths being averted.”


Malaria remains one of the world’s leading killers, claiming the life of one child every two minutes. Most of these deaths are in Africa, where more than 250,000 children die from the disease every year. Children under 5 are at greatest risk of its life-threatening complications. Worldwide, malaria kills 435,000 people a year, most of them children.

SOUNDBITE Chichewa) Alinafe Tsitsi, Mother:
“My husband’s illness from malaria prompted me to come here for the malaria vaccine, because I heard an announcement in my village that the hospital was vaccinating children against malaria, Malaria is a dangerous disease, when I saw how ill my husband was from malaria, I was concerned that if my children got ill from malaria, it would be much worse for them. I don't want my child to suffer from malaria, that is why my child is getting the malaria vaccine.”

The vaccine is a complementary malaria control tool – to be added to the core package of WHO-recommended measures for malaria prevention, including the routine use of insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor spraying with insecticides, and the timely use of malaria testing and treatment.

SOUNDBITE (English) Michael Kayange, Deputy-Director for malaria, Malawi Ministry of Health:
“Malaria is a huge public health problem in Malawi. We see about six million cases each year, and we register close to 3,000 deaths each year. And per day, I would say we register about eight deaths every day. So, it's quite a huge problem, a public health problem in my life. And that's why this malaria vaccine which has potential to prevent some cases and also save some lives, as a country were quite positive about it and they were happy that we're introducing this vaccine.”

The WHO-coordinated pilot programme is a collaborative effort with ministries of health in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi and a range of in-country and international partners, including PATH, a non-profit organization, and GSK, the vaccine developer and manufacturer, which is donating up to 10 million vaccine doses for this pilot.

Financing for the pilot programme has been mobilized through an unprecedented collaboration among three key global health funding bodies: Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; and UNITAID. Additionally, WHO, PATH and GSK are providing in-kind contributions.
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