UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN CONFLICT

23-Apr-2019 00:03:55
The UN Security Council adopted a resolution which encourages a survivor-centred approach to preventing and responding to sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situation. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN CONFLICT
TRT: 3:55
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 23 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

23 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council members voting in favour
3. Med shot, German Foreign Minister
4. Wide shot, Russian ambassador abstaining
5. Wide shot, Chinese ambassador abstaining
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We must recognise that sexual violence in conflict largely affects women and girls because it is closely linked to broader issues of gender inequality and discrimination. Prevention must therefore be based on promoting women’s rights and gender equality in all areas, before, during and after conflict.”
7. Wide shot, Guterres addressing Security Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Pramila Patten, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, United Nations:
“The acute vulnerability of so many women, children and men to sexual violence in conflict situations around the world must now crystalize our resolve into clear action to prevent these crimes. It is essential that we translate promises into practice, and resolutions into solutions. It is time to bring these crimes, and those who commit them, into the spotlight of international scrutiny and to send a clear message that the world will not tolerate the use of sexual violence as a tactic of war and terrorism.”
9. Med shot, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad
10. SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Victims not only have the right to quality care, but also to truth and justice. Reparations complete the healing process and the process of victims’ reintegration, but they also allow society to recognize the evil that has been committed, to combat against stigmatization, discrimination, gender inequality, and to prevent the repetition of crimes of sexual violence.”
11. Med shot, German Foreign Minister and UN Secretary-General at meeting
12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Nadia Murad, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“We had hoped that telling our stories would be the door through which ISIL members would be brought to justice, but today thousands of them enjoy freedom, and thousands others are in jail without a trail. What we are calling for today is to bring the perpetrators of genocide to justice, to bring those who used Yazidi women as weapons of war to a specialized international court as a prelude to their prosecution for committing crimes against women and children. Trying ISIL members in an international court on charges of genocide and crimes of sexual violence against Yazidi women would send a message to others and would prevent the commitment of such crimes in the future.”
13. Wide shot, Security Council
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Amal Clooney, Legal Representative for Nadia Murad and other Yazidi survivors:
“Let us remember that the crimes committed by ISIS against women and girls are unlike anything we have witnessed in modem times. ISIS controlled territory the size of the United Kingdom and ruled over eight million people. More than 40,000 foreign fighters from 110 countries are estimated to have joined ISIS’s ranks in Iraq and Syria. But the question of bringing them to justice has barely raised a whisper.”
15. Wide shot, Security Council
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Amal Clooney, Legal Representative for Nadia Murad and other Yazidi survivors:
“Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen: This is your Nuremberg moment. Your chance to stand on the right side of history. You owe it to Nadia, and to the thousands of women and girls who must watch ISIS members shave off their beards and go back to their normal lives, while they, the victims, never can.”
17. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
The UN Security Council adopted a resolution which encourages a survivor-centred approach to preventing and responding to sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situation.

The Resolution, which was presented by Germany, calls upon UN Member States to strengthen legislation and enhance investigation and prosecution of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations consistent with fair trial guarantees under international law. It also urges countries to strengthen access to justice for victims of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations, including through the prompt investigation, prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of sexual and gender-based violence, as well as reparations for victims as appropriate.

Speaking prior to the vote, UN chief Antonio Guterres said despite many efforts, sexual violence continued to be a horrific feature of conflicts around the world. He added, “We must recognise that sexual violence in conflict largely affects women and girls because it is closely linked to broader issues of gender inequality and discrimination. Prevention must therefore be based on promoting women’s rights and gender equality in all areas, before, during and after conflict.”

UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten said a decade after the establishment of her mandate, the reality remained that the implementation of resolutions, policies, agreements and commitments remained slow, criminal accountability for these crimes remained elusive. She added that wars were still being fought on and over the bodies of women and girls.

Patten said, “The acute vulnerability of so many women, children and men to sexual violence in conflict situations around the world must now crystalize our resolve into clear action to prevent these crimes. It is essential that we translate promises into practice, and resolutions into solutions. It is time to bring these crimes, and those who commit them, into the spotlight of international scrutiny and to send a clear message that the world will not tolerate the use of sexual violence as a tactic of war and terrorism.”

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Denis Mukwege said through the progress made in combatting sexual violence, no political or military official could now overlook that using rape as a tactic of war violates international law. He said he supports all initiatives that seek to lay a red line against this barbaric act. He hoped the international community would set up a fund to provide reparations to victims of these type of crimes in countries that are failing to shoulder their responsibility or need assistance in doing so.

SOUNDBITE (French) Denis Mukwege, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate:
“Victims not only have the right to quality care, but also to truth and justice. Reparations complete the healing process and the process of victims’ reintegration, but they also allow society to recognize the evil that has been committed, to combat against stigmatization, discrimination, gender inequality, and to prevent the repetition of crimes of sexual violence.”

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nadia Murad said many Yazidi women and girls who suffered sexual violence by ISIL fighters broke all barriers of fear and shame and told their stories in public, but, until now, not a single person was tried for the crime of sexually enslaving Yazidis.

Murad said, “We had hoped that telling our stories would be the door through which ISIL members would be brought to justice, but today thousands of them enjoy freedom, and thousands others are in jail without a trail.” She called on the Security Council to “bring the perpetrators of genocide to justice, to bring those who used Yazidi women as weapons of war to a specialized international court as a prelude to their prosecution for committing crimes against women and children.”

The Nobel Laureate said trying ISIL members in an international court on charges of genocide and crimes of sexual violence against Yazidi women “would send a message to others and would prevent the commitment of such crimes in the future.”

Barrister Amal Clooney reminded Council Members that the crimes committed by ISIS against women and girls “are unlike anything we have witnessed in modem times.” She added, “ISIS controlled territory the size of the United Kingdom and ruled over eight million people. More than 40,000 foreign fighters from 110 countries are estimated to have joined ISIS’s ranks in Iraq and Syria. But the question of bringing them to justice has barely raised a whisper.”

Clooney gave the Council four options to dealing with crimes committed by ISIL, including a referral to the International Criminal Court, setting up a court through a treaty by like-minded states who believe in justice, setting up a court through the European Union, or a hybrid court set up between the UN and Iraq such as those done in the cases of Sierra Leone and Cambodia.

Clooney told the Security Council, “Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen: This is your Nuremberg moment. Your chance to stand on the right side of history. You owe it to Nadia, and to the thousands of women and girls who must watch ISIS members shave off their beards and go back to their normal lives, while they, the victims, never can.”
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