UN / INDIGENOUS FORUM

22-Apr-2019 00:03:13
More than 1,000 Indigenous Peoples participants from all over the world gathered at United Nations Headquarters to participate in the eighteenth session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. This year’s session is focused on the generation, transmission and protection of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / INDIGENOUS FORUM
TRT: 03:13
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ONONDAGA / SPANISH / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

22 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Med shot, indigenous women outside UN Headquarters
3. Wide shot, General assembly
4. Various shots, indigenous people in the audience
5. Various shots, cultural performance by Sjisawishek 'Keeping the fire strong', indigenous girls of the Onondaga Nation, Haudenoaunee Confederacy
6. Various shots, Onondaga Nation Chief, Tadodaho Sid Hill, walks up to podium
7. SOUNDBITE (Onondaga) Tadodaho Sid Hill, Chief, Onondaga Nation:
“Bring our minds together in one mind agreed and we thank our creator in the sky world so did our minds so for now this much of the words of greetings I will be able to do.”
8. Various shots, audience
9. Wide shot, General Assembly President Maria Fernanda Espinosa Garces at the podium
10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Maria Fernanda Espinosa Garces, President, General Assembly:
“We are historically indebted with the indigenous peoples, their collective rights, their cultural and identity rights, and their right to health, education, and development, according to their aspirations and their needs. Fifteen percent of the poorest people on earth are indigenous. This demands our concerted and urgent actions. We cannot leave indigenous peoples behind. Their inclusion is crucial if we want to achieve the 2030 Agenda.”
11. Wide shot, audience applause
12. Wide shot, press conference
13. Med shot, journalists
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Anne Nuorgam, Chair of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
“I believe that we need to give more attention to peace and security, especially considering that many indigenous peoples leave in or near areas of conflict, current or emerging. And there is increasing tension and rising levels of violence surrounding traditional indigenous land, territories, and resources. And especially these tensions, they harm our women and girls.”
15. Med shot, reporters
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Henrietta Marrie (née Fourmile) Australian Indigenous Rights Activist:
“The predicted extinction of nearly half the world’s linguistic diversity represents a monumental loss of traditional knowledge, and it is this fear that we are facing today, and how do we get that back? We have so many laws and policies now that are now working towards how to engage and how to protect these knowledge systems and how to educate our young people. If we don’t have the land and the resources, we cannot educate our young pole.”
17. Med shot, end of presser
STORYLINE
More than 1,000 Indigenous Peoples participants from all over the world gathered at United Nations Headquarters today (22 Apr) to participate in the eighteenth session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. This year’s session is focused on the generation, transmission and protection of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge.

The session opened with a performance by Sjisäwishék, or ‘Keeping the fire strong’ - indigenous girls of the Onondaga Nation, Haudenoasuanee Confederacy, and a ceremonial welcome by the traditional Chief of the Onondaga Nation, Tadodaho Sid Hill.

In her address to the Forum, General Assembly President, Maria Fernanda Espinosa Garces, said, “we are historically indebted with the indigenous peoples, their collective rights, their cultural and identity rights, and their right to health, education, and development, according to their aspirations and their needs.

Espinosa noted that “fifteen percent of the poorest people on earth are indigenous’ and added that “we cannot leave indigenous peoples behind. Their inclusion is crucial if we want to achieve the 2030 Agenda.”

Indigenous peoples live in some 90 countries, represent 5,000 different cultures and speak the overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 6,700 languages.

At a later press conference, the newly elected Chair of the Forum, Anne Nuorgam, said, “I believe that we need to give more attention to peace and security, especially considering that many indigenous peoples leave in or near areas of conflict, current or emerging.”

Nuorgam said, “increasing tension and rising levels of violence surrounding traditional indigenous land, territories, and resources” are harming “our women and girls.”

Nuorgam is a member of Finland’s Saami Parliament and head of the Saami Council’s Human Rights Unit.

Also speaking at the same press event, Australian Indigenous Rights Activist Henrietta Marrie said, “the predicted extinction of nearly half the world’s linguistic diversity represents a monumental loss of traditional knowledge.”

Marrie said, “if we don’t have the land and the resources, we cannot educate our young pole.”

2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages.

Established by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2000, the Forum provides it with advice and recommendation on indigenous issues. The 16 independent experts of the Forum – eight nominated by UN Member States and others by indigenous organizations globally – work in their personal capacity.

The session runs from 22 April through 3 May, with regional dialogues to be held during the second week.
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