UN / YEMEN

15-Apr-2019 00:03:15
Addressing the Security Council via video link, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, said, “Yemen bleeds. Its people go hungry. Its children, many of them, have not seen the inside of a classroom. In many ways it is one of the world’s most tragic, tragic places.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 03:15
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 15 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

01 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Office of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“Yemen bleeds. Its people go hungry. Its children, many of them, have not seen the inside of a classroom. In many ways it is one of the world’s most tragic, tragic places. This is the spur that encourages us to imagine beyond Hudaydah that we could see progress towards that solution which alone can bring back the hopes of Yemeni families, and the control of Yemen under its political class.”
4. Med shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“UN agencies are rapidly running out of money for essential relief activities. The World Health
Organization projects that 60 percent of diarrhoea treatment centres - the central approach we have to tackling the cholera outbreak - could close in the coming weeks, and services at 50 percent of secondary care facilities could be disrupted. The World Food Programme reports that its pipeline for food vouchers and the in-kind food pipeline will break in June, unless they immediately receive new money. Closing or scaling back such programmes - at a time when we are struggling to prevent widespread famine and roll back cholera and other killer diseases - would be catastrophic.”
6. Med shot, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Virginia Gamba, United Nations Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict:
“The impact of this conflict on children has been horrific. All parties to conflict have acted and reacted militarily to events, resulting in the use and abuse of children in multiple ways. There have been exponential increases in violations throughout the years, as was the case at the end of 2014, when recruitment and use spurred significantly, and in 2015, which was a devastating year for children, with over 900 children recruited and used, 2,400 killed and maimed and over 150 attacks against schools and hospitals.”
10. Med shot, delegates
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abdullah Ali Fadhel Al-Saadi, Permanent Representative of Yemen to the United Nations:
“We call upon the Security Council to shoulder its responsibility and to preserve its credibility to implement its own resolutions on Yemen. We call for greater pressure to be exerted on the Houthi militias to implement the Stockholm Agreement as soon as possible. This agreement is a cornerstone at the very heart of the political process and it is necessary therefore to identify the entity which is undermining the agreement, because if this fails, this will kill the hope our people have to have peace and an end to the conflict.”
12. Wide shot, Council
STORYLINE
Addressing the Security Council via video link, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, today (15 Apr) said, “Yemen bleeds. Its people go hungry. Its children, many of them, have not seen the inside of a classroom. In many ways it is one of the world’s most tragic, tragic places.”

Griffiths told Council members he was committed to helping facilitate a political solution to end the war, beyond the UN-backed plan which the warring parties signed up to in Sweden last December to de-escalate fighting around Hudaydah, as the start of a process to hopefully end the fighting nationwide,

He said, “this is the spur that encourages us to imagine beyond Hudaydah that we could see progress towards that solution which alone can bring back the hopes of Yemeni families, and the control of Yemen under its political class.”

UN Affairs Chief, Mark Lowcock, was next to brief the chamber, also via video-link, picking up Martin Griffith’s passionate plea for the international community to act now, to save countless Yemeni lives.
Lowcock said, “UN agencies are rapidly running out of money for essential relief activities.”

He said, the World Health Organization (WHO) “projects that 60 percent of diarrhoea treatment centres - the central approach we have to tackling the cholera outbreak - could close in the coming weeks, and services at 50 percent of secondary care facilities could be disrupted.”

The World Food Programme (WFP), Lowcock added, “reports that its pipeline for food vouchers and the in-kind food pipeline will break in June, unless they immediately receive new money.”

He said, “Closing or scaling back such programmes - at a time when we are struggling to prevent widespread famine and roll back cholera and other killer diseases - would be catastrophic”

The UN’s Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, focussed on how Yemen’s most vulnerable had borne the brunt of war.

She said, “the impact of this conflict on children has been horrific. All parties to conflict have acted and reacted militarily to events, resulting in the use and abuse of children in multiple ways. There have been exponential increases in violations throughout the years, as was the case at the end of 2014, when recruitment and use spurred significantly, and in 2015, which was a devastating year for children, with over 900 children recruited and used, 2,400 killed and maimed and over 150 attacks against schools and hospitals.”

Gamba said she had secured agreements with both warring parties during her time in office, to strengthen the protection of child lives, and to cut down on the recruitment of children as part of the war effort.

In his address to the Council, Yemeni Ambassador, Abdullah Ali Fadhel Al-Saadi,
called upon the Security Council “to shoulder its responsibility and to preserve its credibility to implement its own resolutions on Yemen.”

He called for “greater pressure to be exerted on the Houthi militias to implement the Stockholm Agreement as soon as possible,” adding that “this agreement is a cornerstone at the very heart of the political process and it is necessary therefore to identify the entity which is undermining the agreement, because if this fails, this will kill the hope our people have to have peace and an end to the conflict.”
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