UN / TUTSI GENOCIDE RWANDA

12-Apr-2019 00:02:55
Marking the 25th Anniversary of the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda, UN chief António Guterres said the commemoration gives “an opportunity to once again raise our voices against racism, xenophobia and related intolerance.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / TUTSI GENOCIDE RWANDA
TRT: 2:55
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NAT

DATELINE: 12 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, United Nations Headquarters

12 APRIL 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2.Various shots, General Assembly Hall
3. Various shots, a minute of silence
4.Wide shot, Guterres walking to the podium
5.SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Today’s commemoration gives us an opportunity to once again raise our voices against racism, xenophobia and related intolerance, including social and ethnic discrimination, anti-Muslim hatred and anti-Semitism. Wherever they occur, these evils should be identified, confronted and stopped to prevent them leading, as they have in the past, to hate crimes and genocide.”
6.Various shots, General Assembly Hall
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“I call on all political, religious and civil society leaders to reject hate speech and discrimination, and to work vigorously to address and mitigate the root causes that undermine social cohesion and create conditions for hatred and intolerance.”
8. Various shots, General Assembly Hall
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda:
“Rwanda does not only contribute soldiers and police, we come to the task with the values in steered by our tragic history. As a nation once betrayed by the international community, we are determined to do our part working with others to make things better going forward.”
10.Various shots, General Assembly Hall
11. SOUNDBITE (French) Esther Mujawayo, Survivor of the Genocide:
“I can tell you that, yes, it is possible that we can reconstruct ourselves, in spite of everything, in spite of horror. You can once again be truly alive but in order to do that, everybody has to devote their efforts. I am thinking about the individuals from the film just played. We have the individuals, we have the collectives and we have politicians. That’s why I am saying that I am happy to be here because I can make this request from you. I can issue this challenge. We have a lesson, Rwanda was a lesson. But let that lesson at least serve to something.”
12. Various shots, General Assembly Hall
STORYLINE
Marking the 25th Anniversary of the Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda, UN chief António Guterres said the commemoration gives “an opportunity to once again raise our voices against racism, xenophobia and related intolerance.”

Speaking at the General Assembly Hall today (12 Apr), UN Secretary-General António Guterres honoured those who were murdered and reflect on the suffering and resilience of those who survived.

Noting that the international community stands in solidarity with the people of Rwanda, Guterres said the reflection on the Rwandan tragedy also must go beyond one country and one moment in history.

Warning that the world is seeing dangerous trends of rising xenophobia, racism and intolerance, including social and ethnic discrimination, anti-Muslim hatred and anti-Semitism, the UN chief reiterated, “wherever they occur, these evils should be identified, confronted and stopped to prevent them leading, as they have in the past, to hate crimes and genocide.”

Guterres called on all political, religious and civil society leaders to “reject hate speech and discrimination, and to work vigorously to address and mitigate the root causes that undermine social cohesion and create conditions for hatred and intolerance.”

The Secretary-General also commended Rwanda for its exemplary role in the international community. It is the fourth largest contributor to UN peacekeeping operations.

Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda told delegates that his country “does not only contribute soldiers and police, we come to the task with the values in steered by our tragic history.”

He added, “as a nation once betrayed by the international community, we are determined to do our part working with others to make things better going forward.”

Esther Mujawayo, a survivor from the genocide said that despite the lasting physical and psychological trauma resulted from the tragedy, “it is possible that we can reconstruct ourselves, in spite of everything, in spite of horror. You can once again be truly alive but in order to do that, everybody has to devote their efforts.”

She added, “we have the individuals, we have the collectives and we have politicians. That’s why I am saying that I am happy to be here because I can make this request from you. I can issue this challenge.”

Mujawayo reiterated, “we have a lesson, Rwanda was a lesson. But let that lesson at least serve to something.”

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda. In one of the darkest chapters in recent human history, more than 800,000 people – overwhelmingly Tutsi, but also moderate Hutu and others who opposed the genocide – were systematically killed in less than three months.
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