GENEVA / SYRIA HUMANITARIAN UPDATE

11-Apr-2019 00:03:12
106,000 people have fled their homes in Idlib province of Syria and at least 190 people have been killed as a direct result of increased military clashes and attacks since February this year, said Thursday Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria. UNTV CH
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: GENEVA / SYRIA HUMANITARIAN UPDATE
TRT: 3:12
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 APRIL 2019 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Exterior shot, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot: Hall XIV
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“Unfortunately, the conflict in Syria is now in its ninth year and its massive humanitarian needs persist. Active conflict continues in some areas as does the risk of further escalation in Idlib with potentially catastrophic humanitarian consequences. Civilian and civilian structures including schools and hospitals cannot and should not be a target. And parties must abide by International Humanitarian Law.”
4. Wide shot, camera, podium
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“The numbers are disturbing. We believe that since February 106,000 people have fled their homes and at least 190 people have been killed as a direct result of increased military clashes and attacks.”
6. Wide shot, podium, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“There are 3million people in Idlib. 2.1 million need humanitarian support and 1.4 million people have already been displaced at least once.”
8. Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“I urge all parties on the ground to cease all violence and I remind them of their obligations and collective responsibility under International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law.”
10. Close up, camera
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“We remain concerned about the welfare of tens of thousands of internally displaced people in the Al-Hol camp in north-east Syria , Al-Hasakah Governorate, most of whom arrived from the last ISIL-held area of Deir es-Zor governerates.”
12. Wide shot, tripods, podium
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“While the influx of new-arrivals has fallen, many of the latest arrivals are in critical health conditions, and the capacity at referral hospitals are already overwhelmed. There is also an urgent need for expanded health services in the camp. Among the vulnerable people are pregnant women, girls, people with disabilities, and unaccompanied and separated minors. Many of them, if not all of them arrived in a very, very, very precarious situation of malnutrition and health issues.”
14. Med shot, journalists
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria:
“As needs remain significant, the UN requires some 27 million dollars to sustain the response for the next several months. The Syria Humanitarian fund has dispersed so far to reserve allocations for some 16 million dollars."
16. Wide shot, cameras, journalists, panel
17. Close up, journalist
18. Med shot, cameraman
19. Med shot, journalists
STORYLINE
Amid reports of intensification of military activity and an increasing number of civilian casualties in Syria, the UN’s newly appointed humanitarian advisor for the country called for an immediate de-escalation of the ongoing violence, and called on all parties to prioritize the need to protect its civilians instead.

Najat Rochdi took office as the Senior Humanitarian Advisor to the UN Special Envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen, in March this year. In her first media encounter, she told journalists in Geneva on Thursday (11 Apr) that immediate action was required in order to facilitate access for humanitarian aid, and offer protection to its civilians.

“The conflict in Syria is now in its ninth year, and massive humanitarian needs persist,” Roshdi told journalists, while noting that “active conflict continues in some areas as does the risk of further escalation in Idlib with potentially catastrophic humanitarian consequences. Civilians and civilian structures including schools and hospitals cannot and should not be a target. And parties must abide by international humanitarian law.”

Idlib, in northwestern Syria, near the Mediterranean Sea and the Turkish border, was the focus of protests and fighting in the early phase of the Syrian war, and later became a base for rebel groups. Several reports over the past days have highlighted the intensification of military activities, which have in turn caused displacement and casualties amongst civilians.

“The numbers are disturbing. We believe that since February 106,000 people have fled their homes and at least 190 people have been killed as a direct result of increased military clashes and attacks. There are 3million people in Idlib. 2.1 million need humanitarian support and 1.4 million people have already been displaced at least once,” Rochdi said.

The humanitarian toll in Idlib has emphasized the need to put the Syrian people at the centre of all discussions and decisions, Rochdi told journalists. The ensuing violence has had a dire impact not only on civilian infrastructure and humanitarian operations, but most importantly on peoples’ lives and safety.

Rochi urged “all parties on the ground to cease all violence” while reminding them of their “obligations and collective responsibility under international humanitarian law and human rights law.” She stressed the important role of Turkey and the Russian Federation in particular, as guarantors of a de-escalation agreement, to continue their efforts to prevent further escalation of violence and a major offensive on Idlib that would have a devastating impact on civilians.

Meanwhile, near the Iraqi border in north-east Syria, Ms. Rochdi noted that Al-Hol camp is currently hosting “tens of thousands of internally displaced people, most of whom arrived from the last ISIL-held area of Deir es-Zor governerates.” The camp, originally set up to be able to accommodate 41,000 people population now exceeds 73,000, stretching resources and raising concerns for basic needs like water, shelter and hygiene. Current healthcare resources are overwhelmed and with large numbers of newcomers to the camp, the need for these facilities is urgent.

“While the influx of new-arrivals has fallen, many of the latest arrivals are in critical health conditions, and the capacity at referral hospitals are already overwhelmed. There is also an urgent need for expanded health services in the camp,” Rochdi observed, particularly as “among the vulnerable people are pregnant women, girls, people with disabilities, and unaccompanied and separated minors. Many of them, if not all of them arrived in a very, very, very precarious situation of malnutrition and health issues,” Rochdi told journalists.

She also warned that an even larger number could be affected, in case of any potential large-scale military offensive in the region. Rochdi stressed that “the UN requires some 27 million dollars to sustain the response for the next several months.”
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed190411b