GENEVA / YEMEN SCHOOL BLAST

09-Apr-2019 00:02:57
An attack on a school in the Yemeni capital Sana’a over the weekend which killed 14 youngsters and critically injured 16 others has been condemned by the UN, amid reports that a child dies every 10 minutes from “preventable causes” in the war-torn country. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / YEMEN SCHOOL BLAST
TRT: 2:57
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
FILE – GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior

09 APRIL 2019, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, United Nations press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, Spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“On Sunday, a blast in Sana’a killed another 14 children - one, four - in school. And injured 16, one, six. Most under the age of nine. More than 400 children killed and seriously injured since beginning of 2019.”
4. Wide shot, podium
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“The incident occurred near two schools. It was almost lunchtime. Students were in class. I am not, I am not informed if there is a military or any kind of potential target or potential military or official building near the two schools.”
6. Wide shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Alessandra Vellucci, Director, United Nations Information Service (UNOG):
“The statement - and I quote – says, ‘I am deeply saddened to hear of the tragic deaths of civilians, the majority of whom were young female students attending school in Saewan area in Sana’a, on seven April. I would like to offer my sincere condolences both to those affected by this tragic loss of life, and to Yemeni civilians across the country, who continue to suffer the devastating impacts of the conflict.’”
8. Med shot, journalists typing, listening
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“We speak about blast right now, and we’ll tell you - we’ll speak more precisely what it is in the coming hours - but right now, I am not in a position to tell you exactly what it is. It is clearly a blast.”
10. Wide shot, press room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“I know that there is clearly a surgery. There is a girl, who succumbed, who died yesterday. There are several ongoing surgeries and medical treatments, and we are actually covering these costs. I do not have more details right now.”
12. Close up, journalist typing on laptop
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, Spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“From 26 March 2015 – one, five - to December 2018 - but again these are only figures that the UN has been able to verify. So, 2,672 children killed in Yemen, and 4,371 children injured.”
13. Med shot, journalists
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“Children are also dying from disease, not only from hunger in Yemen. A child dies every 10 minutes of preventable causes in Yemen; that includes, actually, cholera.”
15. Close up, journalist
16. Med shot, journalist
17. Med shot, visitors
STORYLINE
An attack on a school in the Yemeni capital Sana’a over the weekend which killed 14 youngsters and critically injured 16 others has been condemned by the UN, amid reports that a child dies every 10 minutes from “preventable causes” in the war-torn country.

Christophe Boulierac from UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) told journalists in Geneva today (09 Apr) that on Sunday, “a blast in Sana’a killed another 14 children - one, four - in school, and injured 16, one, six, most under the age of nine.”

He noted that “more than 400 children (have been) killed and seriously injured since beginning of 2019,” adding that many of those injured in the latest attack on the Houthi opposition stronghold “are fighting for their lives” in hospital.

Boulierac said a girl who succumbed to her wounds yesterday and there are “several ongoing surgeries and medical treatments, and we are actually covering these costs.”

Although limited details of the attack are available, the UNICEF spokesperson said that it happened “near two schools. It was almost lunchtime. Students were in class.” He added that the blast shattered windows, unleashing a burst of shrapnel and broken glass into classrooms.

Asked whether the schools were located close to potentially legitimate military targets, Boulierac replied that he was “not informed if there is a military or any kind of potential target or potential military or official building near the two schools.”

The UNICEF spokesperson was unable to provide further details about the exact nature of the deadly attack, however, but said that it came in the context of other outrages on civilians, including one in Hajjah, north of Hudaydah on 9 March, in which 12 children died.

SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“We speak about blast right now, and we’ll tell you - we’ll speak more precisely what it is in the coming hours - but right now, I am not in a position to tell you exactly what it is. It is clearly a blast.”

Since fighting escalated in Yemen in March 2015 between supporters of Yemeni President Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi and Houthi opposition groups, thousands of civilians are believed to have died.

According to UNICEF, from 26 March 2015, to 15 December 2018, 2,672 children have been killed in Yemen and 4,371 youngsters have been injured.

In a statement read by Alessandra Vellucci, Director of the UN Geneva Information Service. UN Special Envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths said he was “deeply saddened to hear of the tragic deaths of civilians, the majority of whom were young female students attending school in Saewan area in Sana’a, on seven April.”

Griffiths called on belligerents to make every possible effort to end civilian suffering and allow young Yemenis to grown up in peace and safety by securing a politically negotiated end to the conflict. He added, “I would like to offer my sincere condolences both to those affected by this tragic loss of life, and to Yemeni civilians across the country, who continue to suffer the devastating impacts of the conflict.”

UNICEF said over and above the threat from deadly violence, the biggest killer in Yemen remains from food insecurity and preventable diseases. Spokesperson Christophe Boulierac said “Children are also dying from disease, not only from hunger in Yemen. A child dies every 10 minutes of preventable causes in Yemen; that includes, actually, cholera.”
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