UN / RUSSIA CRIMEA

18-Mar-2019 00:02:39
On the fifth anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Russian Ambassador Dmitry Polyanskiy said his government has “nothing to be ashamed of,” and noted that for the past three days there have been “festivities in Crimea and the rest of Russia.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / RUSSIA CRIMEA
TRT: 02:39
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 MARCH 2019, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN headquarters

18 MARCH 2019, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. Wide shot, journalists
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations:
“We have nothing to be ashamed of. We have a lot of things to be proud of. During last three days there are festivities in Crimea and in the rest of Russia.”
5. Med shot, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations:
“Since the end of 2014 Ukraine limits very much the crossing of de facto border with Russian Federation in Crimea, in the northern part of Crimea, and if you are a foreigner and even if you hold Russian visa, you’ll not be allowed to enter Crimean Peninsula from the north. The only way you can do it is from Russia. For Ukrainians still until now there are no limitations and last year there was a record flow of Ukrainians according to our statistics about one million people came to Crimea.”
7. Med shot, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations:
“Close of 90 percent the people of Crimea, even now after the region became part of Russian Federation and had to endure a lot of painful but necessary economic reforms, even now people say that they do not regret these desires. So, we are not afraid to show Crimea and to let Crimeans speak to correspondents, to Westerners, to whoever, to tell really what is their position on this case.”
9. Med shot, journalists
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations:
“Now of course Ukrainian politicians try to forget about this, but we all remember what happened at this time. There were direct threats. There were a lot of nationalists who were trying to penetrate the borders of the peninsula, and it was absolutely clear that the authorities, the junta that arrived to power came to power in Kiev, were aiming at kind of cleansing this Russian element from Crimea.”
11. Med shot, journalists
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dmitry Polyanskiy, Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the United Nations:
“I think that it’s very trendy now to really blame everything on Russia. Russia is such a nice scapegoat in Western societies. If nothing comes out of what you are doing, just blame it on Russia and everybody will say, yes, of course, those bad Russians, they are behind this.”
13. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
On the fifth anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Russian Ambassador Dmitry Polyanskiy today (18 Mar) said his government has “nothing to be ashamed of,” and noted that for the past three days there have been “festivities in Crimea and the rest of Russia.”

Polyanskiy said that “since the end of 2014 Ukraine limits very much the crossing of de facto border with Russian Federation in Crimea, in the northern part of Crimea” while “there are no limitations” for Ukrainians entering the peninsula. He said, “last year there was a record flow of Ukrainians according to our statistics about one million people came to Crimea.”

The Russian diplomat said, “close of 90 percent the people of Crimea” support the annexation, “even now after the region became part of Russian Federation and had to endure a lot of painful but necessary economic reforms.”

Polyanskiy said that before annexation “there were direct threats. There were a lot of nationalists who were trying to penetrate the borders of the peninsula, and it was absolutely clear that the authorities, the junta that arrived to power came to power in Kiev, were aiming at kind of cleansing this Russian element from Crimea.”

Responding to a question regarding the 2016 elections in the United States, the Ambassador said it was “very trendy now to really blame everything on Russia. Russia is such a nice scapegoat in Western societies. If nothing comes out of what you are doing, just blame it on Russia and everybody will say, yes, of course, those bad Russians, they are behind this.”
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